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    McNeese State University
   
 
  Dec 17, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog

Financial Aid



State and federal student aid programs-including loans, grants, and work opportunities-are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. The type and amount of aid available to a student usually depends on need and academic achievement, although other factors may be considered. The University considers all applicants without regard to age, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, genetic information, marital status, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation. Complete applications for financial aid must be filed in the Office of Financial Aid before May 1 to be considered for the following fall and spring semesters and the summer session. Guidance for applying for financial assistance can be found on the Office of Financial Aid web page.

Types of Financial Assistance

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Grants

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Federal Pell Grants

The Federal Pell Grant is a need-based program which provides money to help undergraduates pay for their education after high school. For many students, these grants provide a foundation of financial aid, to which aid from other federal and non-federal sources may be added. Unlike loans, grants do not have to be paid back. Pell awards range from $200 to $2900 per semester. Students must meet satisfactory academic progress standards to participate in this program.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is a need-based program to help pay for education after high school. It is for undergraduate students only, and it does not have to be paid back. A student may get up to $500 a year, depending on need, the availability of FSEOG funds, and the amount of other aid received. A student must qualify and be receiving a Federal Pell Grant in order to receive an FSEOG and must meet satisfactory academic progress standards. Every year, the Department of Education provides McNeese a specific amount of funds for the FSEOG program. These awards are made on a first-come, first-served basis until funds are depleted for that year.

GO Grant

The GO Grant is a need-based state program to help support nontraditional and low-to-moderate income students who need additional aid to afford the cost of attending college. To be eligible for a Louisiana GO Grant, a student must be a Louisiana resident, receive a Federal Pell Grant, and have remaining financial need after deducting Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) and all federal/state/institutional grant or scholarship aid (i.e. gift aid) from the student’s cost of attendance.

Loans

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Federal Perkins Student Loan Program

The Federal Perkins Student Loan Program is available to students from low-income families. The maximum amount that a student may borrow is $1500 per semester. These loans are based on evidence of a student’s academic ability as well as economic need. Payment of these loans is at five percent interest with the first payment due nine months after a student leaves the institution or graduates.

Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program

The Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program is available to students who are enrolled for at least six credit hours each semester at the time of awarding and disbursing of funds. Students borrow from the U.S. Department of Education and may apply for a maximum annual loan according to the following schedule:

  • $5,500 for students who have earned less than 30 hours (freshmen).
  • $6,500 for students who have earned at least 30 hours but less than 60 (sophomores).
  • $7,500 for students who have earned at least 60 hours, but have not completed the requirements for a bachelor’s degree (juniors, seniors and graduates not pursuing a graduate degree).
  • $8,500 for graduate students pursuing a graduate degree and enrolled in at least six hours of graduate-level courses. Graduate students not enrolled in at least six hours of graduate level courses may be considered ineligible for the loan program or eligible for lower level loan amounts.

The total of a Federal Direct Stafford Loan award and a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan award may not exceed the annual loan limits. The U.S. Department of Education will deduct an origination fee of up to 3% and a default fee of up to 1% of the principal amount of the loan from each disbursement received by a student. These fees are used to offset the costs of default claims and special allowances.

Continuing and transfer students may apply if they meet satisfactory academic progress standards. A first-time Federal Direct Stafford borrower who has earned less than 30 credit hours cannot receive a Federal Direct Stafford Loan check until he/she has attended classes for 30 days.

Loans of this type are repaid over a period of 10 years, excluding periods of deferment and/or forbearance. Interest does not accrue while the student is enrolled at least half-time (six hours). Repayment of principal and interest commences six months after the day on which the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The interest rate is currently fixed at 3.76%.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program

The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program is available to all students, regardless of family income, who are enrolled for at least six credit hours each semester at the time of awarding and disbursing of funds. Students borrow from the U.S. Department of Education, and loan limits are the same as for the Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program. The total of a Federal Direct Stafford Loan award and a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan award may not exceed the annual loan limits. The U.S. Department of Education will deduct an origination fee of up to 3% and a default fee of up to 1% of the principal amount of the loan from each disbursement received by a student. These fees are used to offset the cost of default claims and special allowances.

Continuing and transfer students may apply if they meet satisfactory academic progress standards. A first-time Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford borrower who has earned less than 30 credit hours cannot receive a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan check until he/she has attended classes for 30 days.

Loans of this type are repaid over a period of 10 years, excluding periods of deferment and/or forbearance. Students must pay interest during in-school, grace, and deferment periods. These interest payments may be made monthly, quarterly, or be added to the principal amount of the loan (i.e. capitalized). Repayment of principal commences six months after the day in which the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time (six hours). The interest rate is fixed at 5.31%.

Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

The Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Loan Program is for parents of dependent students. Parents who do not have adverse credit history may borrow from the U.S. Department of Education and may borrow an amount equal to the cost of education minus estimated financial assistance for each dependent student who is enrolled at least half-time. The interest rate is fixed at 6.31%. The U.S. Department of Education will deduct an origination fee of up to 3% and a default fee of up to 1% of the principal balance of each disbursement. These fees are used to offset the cost of default claims and special allowances.

Repayment of PLUS loans begins immediately and are repaid over a period of 10 years, excluding periods of deferment and/or forbearance. Borrowers should contact the U.S. Department of Education to obtain information regarding possible deferment and/or forbearance options.

On-campus Student Employment

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Through the Federal Work-Study Program, students are awarded a part-time job on campus by the Office of Financial Aid and will be assigned a department to work in by the Office of Human Resources and Student Employment. Students may be considered for employment depending upon financial need, grades, availability of funds, and other factors.

A student desiring employment must have a current application on file and, if requested for work by a department, must be assigned a job by the Office of Human Resources and Student Employment before beginning work each semester or session. This regulation applies to those who have held student jobs previously, as well as to new applicants.

The pay scale is determined by federal regulations and the Minimum Wage Law in effect during the period of employment. A student may not begin work without a work assignment each semester. Student income earned through on-campus employment is taxable and must be claimed on a tax return.

Student Responsibilities

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  1. A student must file an Application for Admission to the University or be accepted for admission in order to apply for financial assistance.
  2. Financial aid is awarded on an annual basis. To be considered for aid in subsequent years, an application must be submitted annually by the announced deadline, usually May 1. Errors can delay receiving financial aid.
  3. A student must provide all additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information requested by either the Office of Financial Aid or the agency to which the student submitted an application by the announced deadline, usually May 1.
  4. A student should read and understand all forms and keep personal copies.
  5. A student receiving and/or applying for financial aid must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress as defined by the policies of the University in order to remain on the various aid programs.
  6. A student who is a recipient of an award not included on the Financial Aid notification letter must inform the Office of Financial Aid of the source and amount. Other awards such as scholarships, tuition exemptions, and Veterans Affairs benefits may reduce the amount of Title IV financial aid for which a student qualifies; however, if a change in award is necessary, a student’s revised package will not contain less gift assistance than the original award of scholarships and grant money.
  7. No student who has earned a baccalaureate degree is eligible for the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), GO Grant, or the LEAP.
  8. A student must be enrolled at least six (6) hours in order to participate in on-campus programs (work, loans, and FSEOG, etc.).
  9. A student must keep the Office of Financial Aid informed of any courses dropped or resignation from school. All address and/or name changes must be reported through the Office of the Registrar.
  10. A student who resigns from school before the end of the academic semester or summer session may have to refund a portion of the aid received which is not applicable to attendance at McNeese. All federal financial aid recipients who officially and/or unofficially withdraw from a class are subject to repaying a portion of the funding received.
  11. To be eligible for Title IV assistance, a student must be enrolled in a degree-seeking program. Since undergraduate students cannot earn a degree through EASE, undergraduates who are enrolled through EASE are not eligible to receive financial aid. If a student is not pursuing a degree plan and/or taking courses for non-credit, the student is not eligible to receive any financial assistance.
  12. A student assigned University employment cannot work until the work assignment has been received from the Office of Human Resources and Student Employment . A student will not be paid for work until the time sheet is signed by both the student and the supervisor. Also, a student may not exceed the allotted hours per week of work assigned. A student must perform in a satisfactory manner the work that is agreed upon in accepting a campus job. Student income earned through on-campus employment is taxable and must be claimed on a tax return.
  13. Any student receiving a Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, and/or Federal Perkins Loan for the first time must complete Student Loan First Time Borrowers Entrance Counseling online at studentloans.gov. The entrance counseling is for the borrower to learn the rights and responsibilities pertaining to the student loan program.
  14. A first-time student loan borrower who has earned less than 30 hours cannot receive student loan funds until he/she has attended classes for 30 days.
  15. A student who does not plan to enroll next semester, resigns during the semester, or graduates and has received a Federal Perkins, Federal Stafford Student Loan, or Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan must complete Exit Counseling online at studentloans.gov before leaving the University. The student is responsible for the Promissory Note and other signed agreements. A student with a loan must notify the lender of changes in name, address, or student status.
  16. All entering freshmen must have earned a high school diploma or GED/HiSET to be eligible for Title IV student assistance. A certificate of completion from high school is not acceptable.
  17. All males must be registered with selective service and may be required to give proof of registration compliance.
  18. The amount of grant and/or scholarship assistance received by a student which exceeds the cost of tuition and required books is taxable income for IRS purposes.
  19. The summer semester is awarded separately from the fall/spring award period. The financial aid office will award the maximum eligibility to the student for the fall/spring award period. If the student has additional eligibility for the academic year, then summer aid will be awarded upon student’s request.
  20. A student having questions concerning his/her award or who is experiencing financial difficulty should call (337) 475-5065 or visit the Office of Financial Aid.

Cost of Attendance

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Cost of attendance is the estimated total amount it will cost to attend an institution. It is determined by Financial Aid using rules established by the U.S. Congress. Cost of attendance is based on average costs incurred by students, and it includes tuition, room/board, books, transportation, and personal miscellaneous expenses. These figures are used solely for the determination of financial aid and does not represent an amount owed to McNeese.

McNeese State University Estimated 2017-2018 Cost of Attendance Louisiana Resident: Fall 2017 and Spring 2018
EXPENSES Living with parents, no dependent children Living with parents, with dependent children Living off campus, not w/ parents Single- student housing Enrolled less than half-time
Tuition/Fees $7,310 $7,310 $7,310 $7,310 $1,727
Room/Board $3,292 $5,306 $9,254 $8,014 $0
Transportation $1,916 $1,916 $1,916 $1,331 $1,916
Miscellaneous $2,042 $2,042 $2,042 $2,042 $0
Books, etc. $1,300 $1,300 $1,300 $1,300 $326
TOTALS $15,860 $17,874 $21,822 $20,582 $3,969

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

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To be eligible for federal financial assistance, a student must meet minimum Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards each term-fall, spring, and summer. SAP requirements apply to all students, including transfer, continuing, and re-entry students as well as those who have not previously participated in federal aid programs.

Minimum GPA

An undergraduate student must maintain an overall GPA of at least 2.0. A graduate student must maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.0.

Minimum Pace 

A student must earn a specified number of credit hours per term based on the student’s classification at the beginning of the term and the total hours attempted for that term.

Minimum Pace for Term*
Classification at Beginning of Term Total Hours Attempted Minimum Hours that Must be Earned
Freshman 5 or less credit hours All attempted
6 to 8 credit hours 3 credit hours
9 to 11 credit hours 6 credit hours
12 or more credit hours 9 credit hours
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior 5 or less credit hours All attempted
6 to 8 credit hours 6 credit hours
9 to 11 credit hours 9 credit hours
12 or more credit hours 12 credit hours
Graduate 5 or less credit hours All attempted
6 to 8 credit hours 6 credit hours
9 or more credit hours 9 credit hours
*The pace percentage (earned vs. attempted credit hours) for each term can vary from 37.5% to 100% depending on the student’s enrollment status.
 
Maximum Timeframe for Program Completion

A student must complete his or her degree or certificate program within the maximum timeframe allowed. The maximum timeframe allowed is 150% of the time normally required for completion of the degree or certificate program. A student who fails to complete his or her program within the maximum timeframe is ineligible to receive federal financial assistance, even if the student did not receive federal financial aid each term of enrollment.

Maximum Timeframe
Degree/Certificate Program Maximum Attempted Credit  Hours Allowed
Associate Degree 90 attempted credit hours allowed
Bachelor’s Degree 180 attempted credit hours allowed*
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate (initial teacher certification) 60 attempted credit hours allowed
Master’s Degree 50 attempted credit hours allowed**
Education Specialist 50 attempted credit hours allowed
2nd Associate Degree 135 attempted credit hours allowed
2nd Bachelor’s Degree 270 attempted credit hours allowed
2nd Master’s Degree 80 attempted credit hours allowed
*Based on a 120-hour bachelor’s degree program.
**Based on a 33-hour master’s degree program.
Students with bachelor’s and master’s degree programs requiring more hours may appeal for extended periods of entitlement.
Other Considerations Relevant to Academic Courses
 
  • Remedial or developmental courses are included in attempted and earned credit hours when calculating maximum timeframe for completion.
  • Courses with withdrawal grades (W, WM, WN, WX, WZ) are included in attempted hours, but not earned hours, and do not affect grade point averages.
  • Courses with grades of incomplete (I, IN, IP, IPC) or not reported (NR) are included in attempted hours, but not in earned hours or GPA calculations until changed to grades other than incomplete, not reported, or withdrawn.
  • Once a grade change has occurred, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of Financial Aid to determine the impact to financial aid eligibility.
  • Federal financial aid may be paid for repeated coursework but may not include more than one repetition of a previously passed course. For example, if a student passes a course with a grade of D or better, federal financial aid can pay for only one more attempt of the same course.
  • For financial aid eligibility purposes, credit hours dismissed through academic bankruptcy are included in attempted hours only; however, in the case of a transfer student, all credit hours and grades are also included in the calculation of the GPA.
  • Transfer students must be in good standing at all previous institutions attended, must have a 2.0 term GPA for the last period of enrollment, and must meet the earned hour requirements specified in the McNeese Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards to be eligible for financial aid. Entering transfer students are not eligible for a financial aid warning term. All previous hours attempted are considered in establishing total remaining federal financial aid eligibility.

Failure to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

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Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is assessed at the end of every term-fall, spring, and summer-after final grades are posted. Email notifications are sent to the student’s University email address if the student does not meet SAP standards. The email notification includes instructions to appeal for continuation of financial aid.

Financial Aid Warning

A student, other than a transfer student, who fails to meet SAP standards is placed on Financial Aid Warning. A student on Financial Aid Warning may receive federal financial aid for the next term of enrollment without appeal.

Financial Aid Suspension

A student who fails to meet SAP standards while on Financial Aid Warning is placed on Financial Aid Suspension and is not eligible to receive federal financial aid. The student may appeal to request continuation of federal financial aid. A successful appeal allows continuation of eligibility of federal financial aid for the next term. If the appeal is unsuccessful and the student wishes to reestablish eligibility for federal financial aid, the student must enroll, cover tuition and fees from sources other than federal financial aid, and meet SAP standards.

Appeal for Continuation of Financial Aid

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A student with extenuating circumstances which negatively impacted academic progress may appeal the financial aid suspension. Examples of extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to, prolonged personal illness or illness of a dependent, serious accident, or death of an immediate family member.

  • Federal financial aid SAP and academic suspension appeals are combined into a single process.  
  • Appeal information and instructions are located at www.mcneese.edu/finaid/how-to-appeal, and the appeal process may be accessed through Banner Self-Service or the MyMcNeese Portal.
  • Appeals must be submitted electronically by deadlines published by the Office of Financial Aid.
  • Academic personnel review submissions for appeal and make one of the following decisions:
    • Granted, Placed on Financial Aid Probation;
    • Granted, Academic Plan Approved for One Term;
    • Granted, Academic Plan Approved for Two Terms;
    • Granted, Academic Plan Approved for Three Terms;
    • Granted, Change of Major Required; or
    • Denied.
  • Students placed on an academic plan must meet plan requirements. If a student fails to earn a 2.0 term GPA while on an academic plan, the academic plan will be revoked and the student will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension.
  • Committee appeal decisions are final, are communicated to the student via email, and are uploaded into the student’s record in the financial aid component of the student information system.

Federal Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) Policy

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Federal regulations require Title IV aid, which includes Federal Pell Grant, TEACH Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal Work Study (FWS), and Federal Direct Stafford Loan (Subsidized, Unsubsidized, and Parent) programs, to be awarded under the assumption that a student will attend the University for the entire period in which federal financial assistance is awarded. However, in the event a student withdraws or stops attending class, the University is required to determine if the student has fully earned the awarded Title IV aid. As required by federal regulations, the University uses a pro-rated schedule to determine the amount of federal financial aid that the student “earned” and return the “unearned” disbursed funds to the appropriate federal program. Once 60% of the semester or summer term is completed, the student is considered to have earned all the federal financial aid and will not be required to return any funds.
 
When a recipient of Title IV aid officially withdraws or unofficially withdraws (drops out, stops attending, is expelled, takes an unapproved leave of absence, or fails to return from an approved leave of absence) on or before completing 60% of the full semester or summer term, or any accelerated part of term, the University must apply the Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) calculation and determine the amount of funds to return to the appropriate federal programs. At McNeese State University, the Office of Financial Aid is responsible for the R2T4 calculation and return of federal funds processes.
 
When a student officially withdraws or resigns from the University, the student’s official withdrawal date will be used in the R2T4 calculation. When a student unofficially withdraws, the student’s last date of attendance or the 50% midpoint of the term, whichever is later, is used in the R2T4 calculation. Federal financial aid regulations consider a student to be an unofficial withdrawal if the student receives all failing or incomplete grades, or a combination of withdrawal, failing, or incomplete grades (F, U, I, IN, IPC, NC, NCE, W, WM, WN, WX, WZ), for the term.

R2T4 Calculation

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Upon determination that a student has withdrawn, whether officially or unofficially, the Financial Aid Office will process the R2T4 calculation. The following steps are used to calculate the amount of aid a student has earned and how much must be returned (if any) to the federal programs:

  1. Determination of the withdrawal date:  For official withdrawals, this is the date the course withdrawal form or resignation is received by the Office of the Registrar. For unofficial withdrawals, this is the mid-point of the term or the last documented date of attendance in an academically-related activity (e.g., documented attendance in a class or lab or submission of an assignment in an on-line course), whichever is later.
  2. Determination of the amount of aid the student earned:  The percentage of aid the student has earned is equal to the percentage of the semester, summer term, or accelerated part of term (payment period) the student has completed.
    1. The percentage of the payment period completed is calculated by dividing the total number of calendar days completed by the total number of calendar days in the term. Scheduled breaks of five or more days are excluded.
    2. The amount of aid the student has earned is calculated by multiplying this percentage by the total amount of Title IV aid disbursed (and that which could have been disbursed) to the student.
    3. For example, if a student completes 35 days of a 118-day term, the percentage completed is 29.7% (35 completed days / 118 total days). If $2000 has been disbursed, the student is entitled to only $594, or 29.7% of that aid.
    4. A student who did not receive all of the funds earned may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement.
    5. Once 60% of the payment period is completed, the student is considered to have earned all federal aid and return of federal funds is not necessary.
  3. Determination of the amount of aid the student did not earn:  The amount of Title IV aid which must be returned is based on the percentage of unearned aid. That percentage is computed by subtracting the earned aid percentage from 100%. For example, if the earned aid percentage is 29.7%, the unearned aid percentage is 70.3% (100% - 29.7% earned = 70.3% unearned).
  4. Determination of the amount of aid the University must return:  The University will remit the percentage of the unearned Title IV funds that were disbursed or that could have been disbursed to the federal programs. The funds will be returned no more than 45 days from the date of the official withdrawal or the last date of attendance. The University will return the lesser of the total of unearned aid or an amount equal to institutional charges multiplied by the percentage of unearned aid. Unearned aid will be returned to the federal programs in the order listed below, and the University will bill the student for any account balance created when Title IV aid is returned.
    1. 1st - Unsubsidized Federal/Direct Loans
    2. 2nd - Subsidized Federal/Direct Loans
    3. 3rd - Federal PERKINS Loans
    4. 4th - Federal PLUS Loans
    5. 5th - Federal Pell Grant
    6. 6th - Federal SEOG Grant
    7. 7th - Federal TEACH Grant
    8. 8th - Other Title IV Programs
  5. Determination of the amount of aid the student must returnThe student will be responsible for repaying any remaining unearned portion that was disbursed to them. If a student’s portion of unearned Title IV funds is a loan, no action by the school is necessary. Regular loan terms and conditions apply. If a student’s portion of unearned Title IV funds is a federal grant, the student will be required to return no more than 50% of the amount received for the payment period.

Financial Aid Overpayments and Loss of Eligibility for Title IV Aid 

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Within 30 days of the determination that the student owes Title IV funds, the student will be sent a notification indicating such. If no payment is received, the University will place registration and transcript holds on the student’s account. The student will lose eligibility for Title IV aid unless the overpayment is paid in full or satisfactory repayment arrangements are made.

Refunds for Official Resignations

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In the event of an official resignation during the University’s refund policy period, the policy will be applied, and tuition will be reduced by that amount. For purposes of this policy, an institutional refund is the credit balance created when the amount paid for institutional charges for a payment period exceeds the amount retained by the institution for the portion of the payment period in which the student was actually enrolled. Once the institutional refund is calculated, the student may be liable for any Title IV funds disbursed to his/her account in excess of the amount allowed by federal regulations. If applicable, the University will collect from the student the portion of federal aid owed. Unearned funds are allocated in the following order to the Title IV program from which the student received assistance:

  • 1st - Unsubsidized Federal/Direct Stafford Loans
  • 2nd - Subsidized Federal/Direct Stafford Loans
  • 3rd - Federal PERKINS Loans
  • 4th - Federal PLUS Loans
  • 5th - Federal Pell Grant
  • 6th - Federal SEOG Grant
  • 7th - Federal TEACH Grant
  • 8th - Other Title IV Programs

After the institutional refund has been credited in this order to the appropriate federal programs, any remaining amount will be returned to the student.

Federal Student Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Law Violations

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Students convicted of a federal or state offense of selling or possessing illegal drugs may not be eligible for federal student aid. If the Office of Financial Aid is notified that a student has been convicted of possession or sale of illegal drugs during the academic year, all federal student aid will be suspended immediately.

The chart below indicates the period of ineligibility for federal student aid, dependent on whether the conviction was for sale or possession and whether the student had previous offenses. Convictions are considered only if they were for an offense which occurred during a period of enrollment in which the student was receiving federal student aid.  Additionally, a conviction that was reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record does not count. A conviction for sale of drugs is inclusive of convictions for conspiring to sell drugs. 

Period of Ineligibility for Conviction of Possession of Illegal Drugs
Possession of Illegal Drugs Period of Ineligibility for Federal Student Aid
1st Offense 1 year from date of conviction
2nd Offense 2 years from date of conviction
3rd or Higher Offense Indefinite period
Period of Ineligibility for Conviction of Sale of Illegal Drugs
Sale of Illegal Drugs Period of Ineligibility for Federal Student Aid
1st Offense 2 years from date of conviction
2nd or Higher Offense Indefinite period

Students regain eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends or when they successfully complete a qualified drug rehabilitation program. Students with further drug convictions will become ineligible once again. Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain aid only after successfully completing a rehabilitation program, or if a conviction is reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record. In such instances, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains eligibility. It is the student’s responsibility to certify to the Office of Financial Aid the date of conviction and completion of a drug rehabilitation program.

Default Prevention and Reduction Measures

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In an effort to reduce default rates for the Federal Stafford Student Loan Program, Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan Program, Federal Supplemental Loan for Students Program, Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students Program, and the Federal Perkins Loan Program, and prevent future defaulted student loans, the University has adopted the following default prevention and reduction measures.

Measures Adopted by the University

  • Before awarding a student loan, an aid officer must verify that the applicant, including transfer student applicant, has maintained an overall GPA greater than or equal to 2.0, as well as earned a GPA of at least 2.0 with at least the minimum number of hours during the last academic year, as required by current Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards for financial aid recipients.
  • If a student loan award is processed after mid-term, and the student’s mid-term grades do not meet current minimum Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid recipients, the Office of Financial Aid reserves the right to withhold the student loan award. Students may appeal this decision to the Director of Financial Aid.
  • After final grades are posted for each academic year, students who fail to meet the minimum Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid recipients have the right to appeal in writing to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee. The committee made up of faculty, staff, and student representatives, will review the student’s appeal letter and grade history. The committee will grant or deny the student’s appeal. If the student is appealing for grant/job assistance in addition to loan assistance, the committee may grant all other assistance and deny the student loan.
  • Borrowers with defaulted student loans may not receive an official academic transcript until the loan is paid in full, but can receive an unofficial academic transcript at any time. Defaulted borrowers may appeal this decision to the Director of Financial Aid. This policy is requested by the State of Louisiana Guarantee Agency, and is in accordance with ACT 808 adopted by the Louisiana Legislature during the 1990 regular session.
  • A student whose parent has defaulted on a Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) which was borrowed on behalf of the student may not receive an academic transcript until the loan is paid in full. This policy is consistent with the treatment of defaulted Federal Stafford Student Loan borrowers provided for by ACT 808.

Measures Mandated by Federal Regulation

  • First-time borrowers who have earned less than 30 semester hours must attend classes for 30 days prior to receiving loan proceeds.
  • First-time borrowers must complete the entrance counseling prior to receiving loan proceeds. At this time, borrowers are counseled regarding their rights, responsibilities and obligations pertaining to repayment of their student loan(s).
  • All borrowers who graduate, transfer, resign, or do not return to McNeese the subsequent semester must complete the exit counseling. All graduating seniors must complete exit counseling and/or attend a personal exit interview with the McNeese Perkins Loan Office prior to receiving their diploma. At this time, borrowers are counseled regarding their rights, responsibilities, and obligations pertaining to repayment of their student loan(s).
  • The University must notify the lending institution of the Guarantee Agency within 60 days after a borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half time (six credit hours).
  • Borrowers with defaulted student loans are not eligible to receive any further Title IV assistance until the loan is fully repaid or satisfactory repayment arrangements have been made.