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    McNeese State University
   
 
  Dec 17, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog

Academic Regulations



Student Responsibility

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Each student is personally responsible for completing all degree requirements established by the University and the appropriate college and department. It is the student’s responsibility to be informed of requirements and any changes which may be implemented. A student’s advisor may not assume these responsibilities and may not substitute, waive, or exempt the student from any established requirement or academic standard. Additionally, students are held responsible for rules and regulations governing University requirements such as routine registration, academic standards, student activities, and organizations.

Academic Integrity

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McNeese State University seeks to strengthen the value of student academic achievement by fostering a learning environment which is based on honesty, respect, fairness, responsibility, and excellence. Consequently, the University expects all members of its academic community to demonstrate honesty and integrity in all relationships and in all coursework. Academic dishonesty in any form is not tolerated, and serious penalties are reserved for those who cheat, plagiarize, and in any form or fashion compromise the integrity of the teaching-learning process. Procedures for handling alleged cheating incidents are prescribed in the Student Handbook which is available online or in print format in the Office of University Services and Campus Life.

General Information

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Academic Year

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  1. The regular academic year of nine months is divided into two semesters of approximately 15 weeks each, the first beginning in August and the second ending in May. A six-week summer session begins soon after the close of the regular academic year and ends in July. In addition to the two semesters and summer session, pre-sessions and accelerated sessions consisting of three, four, seven, and eight weeks are offered.
  2. A calendar for the current year may be found at the following link: Academic Calendar .

Change of Address or Name

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  1. A student must provide a current mailing address at the time of admission. If the address changes while the student is enrolled, the new address must immediately be updated with the Office of the Registrar or through Banner Self-Service. A student is responsible for all communications sent to the mailing address currently on file in the offices of the University.
  2. A student wishing to change his/her name on University records because of marriage, divorce, or court order must complete the change of name form in the Office of the Registrar and present official supporting documents for the name change.

Change of Curriculum

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  1. A curriculum change form may be obtained from the current or new academic department. The academic department head(s) involved must approve the change. The completed form must be returned to the Office of the Registrar. A student who is unable to come to campus to complete this process should contact his/her academic advisor for assistance.
  2. A curriculum may be changed through the last date for late registration for a regular semester or summer session. Any curriculum change form received after the last date for late registration will be processed for the next semester in which the student enrolls. However, if requested by the student and approved by the registrar, a curriculum change form received after the last date for late registration may be processed for the current term, provided the change does not negatively impact the student or the University.

Classification

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  1. Freshman: Students who have not earned 30 credit hours.
  2. Sophomores: Students who have earned 30 credit hours, but not more than 59.
  3. Juniors: Students who have earned 60 credit hours, but not more than 89.
  4. Seniors: Students who have earned 90 credit hours.
  5. Preparatory Students: Students who are enrolled in high school and college through a dual enrollment or early admission program.
  6. Special Undergraduate Students: Students pursuing a post-baccalaureate certificate and those not in a degree program, such as visiting students.

Course Numbering System

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  • 090-099: Developmental level
  • 100-199: Freshman level (lower-level)
  • 200-299: Sophomore level (lower-level)
  • 300-399: Junior level (upper-level)
  • 400-499: Senior level (upper-level)
  • 500-699: Graduate level

Course Types

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Internships

Internships are structured, supervised, and short-term programs in which undergraduate or graduate students perform tasks and duties within an organization, which may be external or internal to the University, in order to gain knowledge and experience related to specific learning objectives. Internship programs should benefit both the student and the organization. The internship is usually performed over the course of one semester or during a summer or winter break. The student may or may not earn monetary compensation from the company and/or academic credit from the University. A student must have approval from his/her advisor to enroll in an internship course for academic credit. Interns must work a minimum of 40 hours per academic credit hour awarded. Upper limits of hours worked are determined by each academic department granting credit.

Service Learning Courses

A Service Learning (SL) course is one in which the activity of service applies the knowledge of the course to an external entity. It is not the application of prior knowledge to an outside situation, but the application of content and skills taught in the course for which the service component is designed. Twenty hours of service is considered the minimum needed to both master academic content and appreciate the service being provided. The service will be supervised by the instructor directly or by a community partner under the purview of the instructor. Documentation of the work and tasks completed are provided by the community partner to the instructor at regular intervals determined by the instructor. An agency agreement must be on file for each external entity. Courses approved as Service Learning courses have the SL designation within their respective course descriptions.

Note: The term “course” refers to a minimum 3 credit hour course. The 20 hours of service are actual clock hours of service, per student, per course. The term “external entity” refers to external to McNeese. Any service performed for an internal entity must first be approved by the Service Learning Committee.

Writing Enriched Courses

McNeese faculty are committed to ensuring that graduates write appropriately and effectively both generally and in their chosen field of study. In the general education core, students pursuing a bachelor’s degree must complete 12 credit hours of coursework with the Writing Enriched (WE) designation. A minimum of six additional writing enriched credit hours are required in the major as identified in each specific degree program.

Credit Hours

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  1. Generally, one credit hour is assigned for 750 minutes of class meeting time or 1500 minutes of laboratory meeting time. Variations may occur due to the nature of the course.
  2. The value of each course of instruction and the amount of work required for graduation is stated in terms of semester credit hours.

Final Examinations

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  1. Final examinations are held at the end of each semester or session. Students should review course syllabi for final examination information.
  2. If final examinations for a regular semester do not begin on Monday, a study day is observed one day prior to beginning the examinations. If final exams for a regular semester begin on a Monday, no tests are to be scheduled in lecture only day sections for the Thursday and Friday before final examinations. Any exceptions must be approved by the dean of the college in which the course is offered.

Student E-mail Communication

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  1. McNeese State University, recognizing the increasing need for electronic communication with students, has established email as an official means of communication with students.
  2. An official McNeese State University e-mail address is established for all registered students. The University has the right to send official communications to the University e-mail address, which is based upon the MyMcNeese portal user name assigned to the student.
  3. The University expects that every student will receive e-mail at his or her McNeese State University e-mail address and will read e-mail on a frequent and consistent basis. A student’s failure to receive and read University communications in a timely manner does not absolve that student from knowing and complying with the content of such communications.
  4. Students may elect to redirect (auto-forward) e-mail sent to their University e-mail address. Students who redirect e-mail from their official University e-mail address to another address do so at their own risk. If e-mail is lost as a result of forwarding, it does not absolve the student from the responsibilities associated with communications sent to their official University e-mail address.

Student Identification Card

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  1. All McNeese students are required to have a McNeese State University student identification card. This card is non-transferrable and is the property of McNeese, and University rules and regulations govern its use. Students are required to present the student identification card or identify oneself upon request by University officials. Failure to do so constitutes a violation of the McNeese State University Code of Student Conduct and may result in disciplinary action.
  2. The identification card serves as the student’s library card and admission to University facilities and athletic events.
  3. New students should report to the University Police Station once registered for classes to request an identification card. There is no charge for the initial card; however, there is a charge for replacement cards. Identification cards may be obtained during normal University business hours.

Grades and Grade Point Averages

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Grading System

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  1. A student’s scholastic achievement is indicated by the following grades:
    • A - Excellent: Student’s performance approaches complete mastery of the course requirements.
    • B - Good: Student’s performance is above the level expected from most students, but does not approach complete mastery of the course requirements.
    • C - Average: Student’s performance is about the level expected from most students. Grades of S (satisfactory) and P (pass) also signify average performance.
    • D - Below Average: Student’s performance is at or above the minimum level to pass the course, but does not allow for progression in some programs or subsequent courses.
    • F - Failure: Student’s performance is below the minimum level to pass the course. The grade of U (unsatisfactory) also signifies performance below the level required to pass the course.
  2. A grade of I (Incomplete) may be given for work which is of passing quality but which, because of circumstances beyond the student’s control, is not complete. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the instructor about the possibility of receiving an I grade. A grade of I becomes a grade of F if it is not converted before the deadline specified in the University calendar during the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or within one calendar year if the student does not enroll. The grade of I is not included in computing the student’s grade point average (GPA) until it is resolved into a final grade.
  3. After the final date to register and before a designated date in the University calendar, a grade of WZ is given when an undergraduate student withdraws from a class, while a grade of W is given when a graduate student withdraws from a course or any student resigns from the University. A grade of WM is assigned when a withdrawal is the result of military activation or deployment, while a grade of WX is assigned when a withdrawal is the result of administrative action. The grades of WZ, W, WM, and WX are not included in computing the student’s GPA.
  4. A grade of WN is assigned as a final grade when a student is withdrawn from a class by the instructor for non-attendance in accordance with the Class Attendance regulations. The grade of WN is not included in computing the student’s GPA.
  5. A grade of IN is assigned when a graduate student’s thesis is incomplete, but is in progress.
  6. A grade of AU is assigned when a student audits a course for no credit.
  7. A grade of NR (not reported) is assigned when an instructor does not report a grade by the grading deadline. This is usually resolved and changed to the appropriate grade soon after the grading deadline.
  8. Final grades submitted to the Office of the Registrar can only be changed with a grade change request from the instructor. The grade change request must be approved by the instructor’s department head, academic dean, and the provost and vice president for academic and student affairs. Grade changes must be made no later than the next regular semester after the grade is earned. For more information, see Undergraduate Grade Appeals.

Quality Points and Grade Point Averages

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  1. On the student’s academic record, courses and grades are grouped by undergraduate and graduate level, and grade point averages (GPAs) are calculated for each distinct level.
  2. Quality points are the numerical values assigned to letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F.
    1. For a grade of A, four quality points are assigned for each credit hour for the course.
    2. For a grade of B, three quality points are assigned for each credit hour for the course.
    3. For a grade of C, two quality points are assigned for each credit hour for the course.
    4. For a grade of D, one quality point is assigned for each credit hour for the course.
    5. For a grade of F, zero quality points are assigned for the course.
  3. Quality, or GPA, hours are the number of credit hours in which grades of A, B, C, D, and F are earned.
  4. A GPA is computed by dividing the number quality points earned by the number of quality, or GPA, hours.
    1. The term GPA is computed by dividing the number of quality points earned in a given term by the number of quality, or GPA, hours for that term.
    2. The overall, or cumulative, GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of quality, or GPA, hours.
      1. The overall GPA includes quality points and hours from institutional and transfer coursework.
      2. The overall GPA is used to determine academic honors, graduation honors, academic probation, academic suspension, and program admission.
  5. A 2.0 GPA means a C average, a 3.0 GPA means a B average, etc.
  6. When a course is repeated, the highest grade earned is recognized as the official grade for a course.  All grades earned for the course (regardless of the number of attempts) are included in the computation of the term and overall GPAs.  Prior to Summer 1995, only the last grade earned was included in the computation of the term and overall GPAs.
  7. For meeting graduation requirements, an adjusted GPA or degree GPA may be used. The adjusted GPA is calculated using only the highest grade earned in courses that are repeated. The degree GPA is calculated using only grades earned in courses applicable to the degree. Neither the adjusted GPA nor the degree GPA is placed on the student’s transcript. For other on-campus purposes, a student may apply to the Registrar’s Office for the calculation of an adjusted GPA. Colleges may set specific rules regarding admission into and graduation from specified programs in reference to the adjusted GPA.

Academic and Graduation Honors

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Academic Honors
  • Honor Roll: Any full-time student who earns a term GPA of 3.0 or higher is placed on the Honor Roll for that fall or spring semester.
  • President’s Honor List: A full-time student who earns a term GPA of 3.5 or higher and is enrolled in at least 15 credit hours that generate quality points is placed on the President’s Honor List for that fall or spring semester. A graduating senior enrolled in less than 15 credit hours may be placed on the President’s Honor List provided the student was on the President’s Honor List the previous semester.
Graduation Honors

A student graduating with a bachelor’s degree and an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher receives one of the following graduation honors:

  • Summa Cum Laude for an overall GPA of 3.90-4.00
  • Magna Cum Laude for an overall GPA of 3.70-3.89
  • Cum Laude for an overall GPA of 3.50-3.69

To fairly determine graduation honors, the University considers the entire academic record of each student, including credits attempted and earned prior to filing Academic Bankruptcy or Amnesty at McNeese or any other institution.

Mid-term and Final Grades

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  1. Final grades are posted to the student’s official transcript by the Office of the Registrar.
  2. Mid-term and final grades may be viewed by accessing Banner Self-Service.
  3. A student who requires an official report of final grades may request an official transcript from the Office of the Registrar.

Removal of I Grades

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  1. The grade which removes the I grade must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by a designated date in the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled at McNeese (see Academic Calendar ) or within one calendar year if the student does not enroll.
  2. The student must make arrangements to complete all course requirements by the designated deadline.
  3. A grade of I becomes a grade of F if it is not converted by the deadline.
  4. Students who received an incomplete grade during a previous semester must not re-enroll in the same course. Arrangements for completing work from a previous semester are to be made between the instructor assigning the grade and the student.

Transcript of Academic Record

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  1. Any person who has attended the University may obtain an academic transcript if he/she is clear with all departments.
  2. Transcripts can be requested via the Transcript Request form which must be signed by the person whose transcript is being requested and accompanied by a valid and current photo ID or electronically through the student’s Banner Self-Service account. More information can be obtained from the office of the registrar or at www.mcneese.edu/registrar/transcripts.
  3. Except during school holidays and at the end of the semester, transcripts are usually prepared within two to three days after the request is received. At the end of each semester, approximately five days are required to process a transcript request.
  4. McNeese State University utilizes e-Scrip Safe to deliver official transcripts electronically. Electronic delivery is now mandatory for all transcript requests, except those for students with initial attendance prior to the spring of 1985 for whom electronic delivery is not available.

Undergraduate Grade Appeals

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A student who feels that the final grade received in an undergraduate course is incorrect should discuss the matter with the instructor, department head, and college dean. The appropriate steps to appeal a final grade are as follows:

  1. Instructor: The student confers with the faculty member who assigned the grade and tries to resolve the difference.
  2. Department Head: If the problem is not resolved, the student obtains the grade appeal packet from the Office of the Registrar. The student submits the completed grade appeal packet to the head of the department in which the grade was assigned. This must be done before the 20th class day of the next regular fall or spring semester after the grade was assigned. The department head investigates the appeal and makes a recommendation to the faculty member and the student.
  3. Dean: If either party is dissatisfied with the department head’s recommendation, the appeal is forwarded within 10 school days to the dean of the college in which the grade was assigned. The dean investigates and recommends a solution.
  4. University Grade Appeals Committee: If the problem is not resolved with the dean’s recommendation, either party may appeal in writing to the University Grade Appeals Committee within seven school days. If the appeal involves either a faculty member or student member of the committee, a substitute faculty member or student member of the committee is selected to serve for that appeal review only.
    1. Within 15 school days of receipt of a written appeal from a student or faculty member, the committee considers the matter to determine if the appeal has sufficient basis to conduct a formal hearing. A vote of yes by two members of the committee is required to grant a formal hearing. In the case where a formal hearing is denied, the student is notified of the finding and given 14 days to submit additional information and request a reconsideration of the case. If a reconsideration is requested, the committee reviews the additional information submitted and votes whether to grant a formal hearing. If the request to reconsider is denied, the appeal is also denied and the student will be notified.
    2. If a formal hearing is scheduled, both the faculty member and the student are notified of the date, time, and place of the hearing at least four school days prior to the hearing. At the hearing, both the faculty member and the student appear, present their cases, and introduce into evidence tests, papers, grade reports, records of class procedures, and the like, in support of their cases. If the committee feels further evidence is needed, it may call on other witnesses to give additional information. The committee delivers its written recommendation to the provost and vice president for academic and student affairs, the dean, the department head, the faculty member, and the student involved.
    3. If the committee rules in favor of the student, it recommends the appropriate grade change. The provost and vice president for academic and student affairs then rules on the recommendation of the committee and informs, in writing, the student, the faculty member, the registrar, and other appropriate University personnel.

Transfer Credit Evaluation

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The perogative for accepting a course for credit belongs to the institution to which a student transfers. McNeese’s process of evaluating credits from other schools includes the evaluation of course learning objectives and grading policies, as well as established transfer articulation agreements, such as the Louisiana Board of Regents’ Master Course Articulation Matrix. The steps in evaluating transfer credit are:

  1. Determine if the institution where the credit was earned is regionally accredited or recognized. To determine accreditation for U. S. schools, McNeese utilizes the Council for Higher Education Accreditation’s database at www.chea.org . For schools outside the United States, publications from the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and NAFSA: Association of International Educators are utilized. If institutions are not regionally accredited, consideration is given to the transfer credit acceptance recommendations of selected institutions or state educational agencies in the states in which the institutions are located.
  2. If the course work was earned at an institution which awards credit in quarter hours, the credits are converted to semester hours. (The number of quarter hours multiplied by 2/3 equals the number of semester hours.)
  3. If a school uses a different grading scale or grade designations, the grade will be interpreted according to McNeese policy.
  4. The Office of the Registrar reviews the course description, level, and prerequisites and then awards credit for acceptable courses. Other materials such as syllabi, exams, and/or faculty credentials may be reviewed to determine if course content and objectives are comparable to the course expectations at McNeese.
  5. Applicability of transfer credit to the student’s McNeese degree program is determined by the student’s academic department.
  6. Lower-level courses (100-level and 200-level) will not transfer as upper-level courses (300-level and 400-level). A lower-level transfer course may be equated to an upper-level McNeese course on a course articulation guide; however, the lower-level transfer course cannot be used in computing the number of upper-level course credits required at McNeese for degree completion.
  7. Credit for remedial or developmental courses will not be awarded, except in cases of cross-enrollment with an approved community college. Additionally, credit will not be awarded for courses that do not count toward a degree at McNeese or at the institution where taken.
  8. Credits earned while under suspension from McNeese or another college or university is not usually accepted for credit at McNeese; however, credit earned from a community college while under suspension from McNeese or another University of Louisiana System institution may be accepted for a degree at McNeese provided grades of C or higher are earned in each of the courses to be transferred.
  9. McNeese computes the GPA on all courses except those with grades of W, WA, WB, WC, WD, WM, WN, WS, WU, WX, WZ, S, SP, U, P, and NC. Incomplete grades are computed in the overall GPA if they were included in the GPA at the institution attended.
  10. Grading systems vary at other colleges and universities. Some important calculations that may differ from the prior institution follow:
    1. Grade designations of + and - are not recognized.
    2. Pass, Satisfactory, and Credit will count as earned hours, but will not be used in the computation of the GPA.
    3. Fail will count as hours pursued, but not as hours earned, and will be used in the computation of the GPA.
    4. Unsatisfactory or No Credit will not count as hours pursued or earned, and will not be used in the computation of the overall GPA.
    5. McNeese will compute the GPA for transfer students in the same manner as for McNeese students. All hours pursued and total quality points earned are used to calculate the overall GPA.
    6. If a course is repeated, the highest grade earned is recognized as the official grade for the course; however, all grades earned for the course (regardless of the number of attempts) are included in the computation of the term and overall GPAs.
  11. A student who feels that the evaluation of transfer credit is incorrect should proceed as follows:
    1. Consult the Office of the Registrar to try to resolve the difference.
    2. If the problem is not resolved, the student should file a written appeal with the Office of the Registrar.
    3. A course description and other pertinent documentation of the course(s) in question will be forwarded, along with a request for a recommendation, to the head of the department in which the subject is taught.
  12. Some transfer articulation agreements exist between McNeese State University and other colleges and universities in Louisiana. These agreements outline the correlation between McNeese courses and courses from other institutions. To aid students transferring within the state, the Louisiana Board of Regents and state institutions developed a master course articulation matrix, which can be viewed at http://www.regents.la.gov/page/master-course-articulation-matrix.
  13. Completion of the Associate of Arts/Science Louisiana Transfer (AALT/ASLT) degree guarantees that the student has met, in full, all lower-level general education requirements at the receiving Louisiana public university. Graduates transferring with the transfer degree will have junior status. Courses or GPA requirements for specific majors, departments, or schools are not automatically satisfied by an AALT/ASLT degree. More information about the associate’s degree for transfer can be found at www.latransferdegree.org.

Prior Learning Assessment Programs

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Students may obtain credit for prior learning through the following assessment programs:

  • McNeese State University Advanced Placement Program
  • McNeese State University Credit Examination Program
  • College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP)
  • College Board College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  • DSST Exams
  • International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme
  • Louisiana Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST)
  • Military Training and Experience
  • Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Portfolio Credit
  • StraighterLine

Credit earned via prior learning assessments is indicated as such on the student’s transcript. A grade of P, P-CR, or CRD is awarded, which is included in earned hours, but not in the computation of any GPA or determination of academic standing. The applicability of prior learning assessment credit to a degree is determined by the student’s academic department.

Credit earned through any prior learning assessment program does not count toward the TOPS award continuation requirements of 24 earned credit hours per academic year.

A maximum of 45 credit hours of non-traditional credit, including, but not limited to, extension credit, correspondence credit, and credit from prior learning assessments, may be used toward a bachelor’s degree; a maximum of 24 credit hours of non-traditional credit may be counted toward an associate’s degree.

To ensure that credit for a correspondence course will be counted toward a degree, a student must obtain approval in writing from his/her advisor and department head before registering for the course. A student must take the final examination of a correspondence course under the supervision of the Office of Testing Services. After a correspondence course is completed, the student should request the registrar of the college from which the course was taken to send an official transcript of credits to the Office of the Registrar at McNeese.

McNeese State University Advanced Placement Program

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  1. Undergraduate students with special competence in some subject areas may participate in the University’s advanced placement program in the following ways:
    1. English:
      1. Students who have an ACT English score of at least 32 and ACT composite score of at least 28 will receive credit for ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students who have a revised SAT writing and language score of at least 37 and a revised SAT total of at least 1310 will receive credit for ENGL 101 and ENGL 102.
      2. Students who have an ACT English score of at least 28 and ACT composite score of at least 28 will receive credit for ENGL 101. Students who have a revised SAT writing and language score of at least 34 and a revised SAT total of least 1310 will receive credit for ENGL 101.
      3. Students who have an ACT English score of 26 or 27 may elect to take ENGL 102 as their first English. Students who have a revised SAT writing and language score of 33 may elect to take ENGL 102 as their first English. After completion of ENGL 102 with a grade of C or better, students will receive credit for ENGL 101.
    2. Foreign Languages: A student with exceptional high school preparation in French, Latin, or Spanish may be enrolled at the advanced level. If the student earns a grade of C or better in the advanced course, credit may be awarded in the appropriate lower-level course(s).
    3. Mathematics: A student who earns an ACT score of 25 in mathematics (or a 590 in mathematics on the revised SAT) will receive credit for MATH 113. A student may be placed into MATH 190 with an ACT mathematics score of 27 or a revised SAT mathematics score of 630. Upon completion of MATH 190 with a grade of C or better, credit will be granted for MATH 170. Upon completion of MATH 291 with a grade of C or better, credit will be granted for MATH 175.
    4. Music: Students who successfully complete special departmental advanced placement examinations in piano may be granted credit for PIAN 115, PIAN 116, PIAN 215, and PIAN 216.
    5. Nursing: Graduates from a Louisiana or an out-of-state associate’s degree in nursing or practical (vocational) nursing program who are currently licensed in good standing to practice in Louisiana may be eligible for advanced standing in the BSN Program.
      1. The LPN seeking a BSN degree must meet eligibility requirements for the clinical nursing sequence. If the student is accepted into the clinical nursing sequence, nine credit hours will be awarded for NURS 310 and NURS 326.
      2. The student with an ASN degree from a nationally-accredited program who is seeking a BSN degree will be awarded 39 credit hours of NURS 499. Credit will be awarded for NURS 429 upon successful completion of an approved certification exam for registered nurses.
  2. To grant advanced placement based on satisfactory performance at a higher level, the course taken must be the first attempt of an academic course in the discipline granting college credit.
  3. To award credit as outlined above, a student’s academic advisor or department head, or when appropriate the testing officer, must submit the necessary documentation to the director of advanced placement for final approval.
  4. Inquiries about the McNeese State University advanced placement program should be made to the director of advanced placement in the Department of General and Basic Studies.

McNeese State University Credit Examinations

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Students with special training or experience may have acquired knowledge traditionally gained from certain college courses. Departments may offer such students credit examinations and award college credit for the courses provided the equivalent of a C or better is scored on the examinations.

  1. Request forms for credit examinations are issued only if a student demonstrates fundamental knowledge of the subject.
  2. Permission to take a credit examination is granted only to students who are currently enrolled at McNeese.
  3. If a student has ever registered in a course or failed a prior credit examination in the course, a credit examination in the course cannot be taken.
  4. No student may take a credit examination in a course which is a stated or implied prerequisite for an advanced course in the same discipline for which credit has already been earned.
  5. A student or a department can obtain a credit examination request form from the director of advanced placement in the Department of General and Basic Studies. Once eligibility for testing is determined based on the four criteria listed above, the form will be signed by the director of advanced placement.
  6. The student must obtain the signature of his/her department head and the signature of the department head in which the course is taught prior to the examination. A fee of $10 per credit hour is charged for each credit examination. This fee is payable at the Cashier’s window in Smith Hall after the student has obtained all the necessary signatures. The paid Cashier’s receipt must be submitted to the director of advanced placement.
  7. After the testing, the department administering the exam completes the necessary information to request the credit and returns the form to the director of advanced placement.

College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP)

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Students who have participated in the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Program may receive credit for AP examinations as specified in the chart below. AP examination scores should be sent directly to the Office of Testing Services (college code 6403) from the College Board. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Testing Services.

College Board AP Examination
Minimum Score
McNeese Course(s)
Credit Hours
Art History
3
Art 261 or 262
3
4
Art 261, 262
6
Biology
3
Biology 101, 101L, 102, 102L
8
Calculus AB
3
Mathematics 170, 175, 190
10
Calculus BC
3
Mathematics 170, 175, 190, 291
14
Chemistry
3
Chemistry 101, 102
6
Comparative Government and Politics
3
Political Science 240
3
Computer Science A
3
Computer Science 180
3
Computer Science AB
3
Computer Science 180, 281
6
English Language and Composition
3
English 101, 102
6
4
English 101, 102, 201
9
5
English 101, 102, 201, 202
12
English Literature and Composition
3
English 101, 102
6
4
English 101, 102, 201
9
5
English 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Environmental Science
3
Environmental Science 101, 110L
4
European History
3
History 101 or 102
3
4
History 101, 102
6
French Language and Culture
3
French 101, 102
6
4
French 101, 102, 201
9
5
French 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Human Geography
3
Geography 211
3
Latin
3
Latin 101, 102
6
4 Latin 101, 102, 201, 202 12
5 Latin 101, 102, 201, 202, 301 15
Macroeconomics
3
Economics 204
3
Microeconomics
3
Economics 203
3
Music Theory
3
Music 101, 101L
3
5
Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L
6
Physics 1: Algebra-Based 3 Physics 201, 205 4
Physics 2: Algebra-Based 3 Physics 202, 206 4
Physics B
3
Physics 201, 202, 205, 206
8
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
3
Physics 212, 206
4
Physics C: Mechanics
3
Physics 211, 205
4
Psychology
3
Psychology 101
3
Spanish Language and Culture
3
Spanish 101, 102
6
4
Spanish 101, 102, 201
9
5
Spanish 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Statistics
3
Mathematics or Statistics 231
3
Studio Art:  Drawing Portfolio, 2-D Portfolio, or 3-D Portfolio
3
Upon satisfactory review of student’s portfolio and recommendation of the Visual Arts department, three hours of appropriate art studio credit may be granted.
3
United States Government and Politics
3
Political Science 201
3
United States History
3
History 201 or 202
3
4
History 201, 202
6
World History
3
History 121 or 122
3
4
History 121, 122
6

College Board College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

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Through the College Level Examination Program, a national standardized testing program, students can earn college credit by examination. Credit will be awarded by the Office of the Registrar for satisfactory scores as specified in the chart below. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Testing Services.

To ensure that credit earned through CLEP will be applied toward his/her degree, a student should obtain academic department head approval before registering for the examination.

McNeese State University is an official CLEP Test Center (college code 6403) and offers the examinations at regularly scheduled intervals. Additional information and CLEP registration materials may be obtained from the Office of Testing Services or at www.mcneese.edu/testing/clep.

College Board CLEP Examination
Minimum Score
McNeese Course(s)
Credit Hours
American Government
50
Political Science 201
3
American Literature
50
English 301, 302
6
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 50 English 200 3
Biology
50
Biology 101,102
6
Calculus
50
Mathematics 190
4
Chemistry
50
Chemistry 101, 102
6
College Algebra
50
Mathematics 113
3
College Mathematics 50 Mathematics 105 3
English Literature
50
English 201, 202
6
Financial Accounting
50
Accounting 208
3
French Language (Levels 1 and 2)
50
French 101, 102
6
59
French 201, 202
6
College Composition Modular
50
English 101
3
History of the United States I: Early Colonization to 1877
50
History 201
3
History of the United States II: 1865 to the Present
50
History 202
3
Human Growth and Development 50 Psychology 233 3
Introduction to Educational Psychology
50
Psychology 211
3
Introductory Psychology
50
Psychology 101
3
Introductory Sociology
50
Sociology 201
3
Precalculus
50
Mathematics 170, 175
6
Principles of Macroeconomics
50
Economics 204
3
Principles of Microeconomics
50
Economics 203
3
Spanish Language (Levels 1 and 2)
50
Spanish 101, 102
6
63
Spanish 201, 202
6
Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648
50
History 101
3
Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present
50
History 102
3
German Language (Level 1)
50
German 101, 102
6

DSST Exams

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Through the DSST Exam program, students who have earned passing scores on DSST exams may earn college credit. Credit will be awarded by the Office of the Registrar for satisfactory scores as specified in the chart below. Official score reports should be sent directly to McNeese (institution code 7811).

DSST Exam Minimum Score McNeese Course Credit Hours
A History of the Vietnam War 400 History 380 3
Art of the Western World 400 Art 1XX 3
Astronomy 400 Physical Science 102 3
Business Ethics and Society 400 Management 345 3
Criminal Justice 400 Criminal Justice  1XX 6
Environment and Humanity:  The Race to Save the Planet 400 Environmental Science 101 3
Ethics in America 400 Philosophy 1XX 3
Foundations of Education 400 Education 204 3
Fundamentals of Counseling 400 Psychology 1XX 3
Fundamentals of Cybersecurity 400 Computer Science 417 3
General Anthropology 400 Anthropology 201 3
Here’s to Your Health 400 Health and Human Performance 122 3
Human Resource Management 400 Management 1XX 3
Human/Cultural Geography 400 Geography 211 3
Introduction to Business 400 Business Administration 120 3
Introduction to Computing 400 Computer Studies 101 3
Introduction to Law Enforcement 400 Criminal Justices 111 3
Introduction to World Religions 400 Religious Studies 211 3
Lifespan Developmental Psychology 400 Psychology 233 3
Management Information Systems 400 Computer Science 321 3
Money and Banking 400 Economics 325 3
Organizational Behavior 400 Management 1XX 3
Personal Finance 400 Finance 201 3
Principles of Finance 400 Finance 310 3
Principles of Physical Science I 400 Physical Science 101 3
Principles of Public Speaking 400 Communication 201 3
Principles of Statistics 400 Mathematics 231 3
Principles of Supervision 400 Management 1XX 3
Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union 400 History 462 3
Substance Abuse 400 Health and Human Performance 244 3
Technical Writing 400 English 253 3
The Civil War and Reconstruction 400 History 435 3

International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme

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Students who have participated in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme may receive credit for Higher Level (HL) examinations with a minimum score of 4 as specified in the chart below. Students who have participated in this program and who plan to enroll at McNeese should have their IB examination results sent to the Office of the Registrar.

IB Higher Level Examination
Minimum Score
McNeese Course(s)
Credit Hours
Biology
 4
Biology 101, 101L, 102
7
Chemistry
4
Chemistry 101
4
5
Chemistry 101, 102
8
Classical Greek
4
Greek 101, 102, 201
9
5
Greek 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Economics
4
Economics 203, 204
6
English A: Language and Literature
4
English 101, 102
3
5
English 101, 102, 2XX (literature)
9
English A: Literature
4
English 2XX (literature)
3
5
English 2XX (literature)
6
French B: Language
4
French 101, 102, 201
9
5
French 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Geography
4
Geography 2XX
3
German B: Language
4
German 101, 102, 201
9
5
German 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Global Politics
4
Political Science 2XX
3
History
4
History 121
3
5
History 121, 122
6
History, Africa
4
History 2XX
3
History, Americas
4
History 2XX
3
History, Asia and Oceania
4
History 2XX
3
History, Europe and the Middle East
4
History 2XX
3
Islamic History
4
History 2XX
3
Latin
4
Latin 101, 102, 201
9
5
Latin 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Mathematics HL
4
Mathematics 170
3
 
5
Mathematics 170, 190
7
Music
4
Music 100, 318
6
Philosophy
4
Philosophy 2XX
3
Physics
4
Physics 201
3
5
Physics 201, 202
6
Psychology 4 Psychology 101 3
Social and Cultural Anthropology
4
Anthropology 201
3
Spanish B: Language
4
Spanish 101, 102, 201
9
5
Spanish 101, 102, 201, 202
12
Visual Art 4 Art 1XX 3

Louisiana Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST)

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Students pursuing criminal justice as a major are eligible to earn 12 hours of credit through Louisiana Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification and a credit exam. Students with this certification must produce the original certificate to the department head of Social Sciences and the criminal justice program coordinator in order to schedule the credit exam. Once the exam is scheduled, the student will then pay the credit exam fee of $120 ($10 per credit hour) at the Cashier’s Office in Smith Hall. Once the student successfully completes the exam, the department head of Social Sciences will submit a request for credit to the director of advanced placement. The student will then receive credit for CJUS 492: Police Academy Certification.

Military Training and Service

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ACT 191 of the 2011 Louisiana Legislature Regular Session requires public institutions of higher education to award educational credits to veterans for courses that are part of the student’s military training or service and that meet certain academic standards. Furthermore, ACT 716 of the 2014 Louisiana Legislature Regular Session defines a veteran as “a former or current member of the United States Armed Forces or organized militia of the several states and territories, including but not limited to a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, National Guard, Air National Guard, Reserves, State Guard, or a commissioned officer of the Public Health Service, Environmental Science Services Administration, or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or its predecessor, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.”

Credit may be awarded for experience in military occupations and completion of military training as recommended by the American Council on Education in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services. Additionally, a student who has completed four or more months of honorable, federal, continuous active duty may be granted up to two credit hours in personal fitness and conditioning and two credit hours in first aid. To receive credit, a student must present an official document verifying veteran status as defined above, as well as an official transcript of military training and service, such as a Joint Services Transcript. Credit is only awarded in areas currently offered within the University and does not duplicate credit already earned by the student. Any credit awarded is placed on a student’s transcript during the first semester of attendance at McNeese. Questions regarding this policy may be directed to the assistant registrar serving as the Veterans Affairs certifying official.

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Portfolio Credit

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Adult learners may possess knowledge and/or skills of college-level learning through work, training, volunteering, or personal experiences. The Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) portfolio process allows eligible students to petition for credits to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements which cannot be earned by other methods of prior learning assessment, such as advanced placement or credit examinations.

  1. McNeese State University follows the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) policies regarding the assessment of a PLA portfolio:

    1. College credit will be awarded only for college-level learning.
    2. Credit is awarded for learning having a balance between theory and practical application.
    3. Competence levels and credit awards are made by subject matter experts.
    4. Credit should be appropriate to academic course content.
    5. Credit awards and transcript entries are monitored to avoid duplication of credit.
    6. Policies and procedures are fully disclosed and available from the Office of Testing Services.
    7. Fees charged are based on services, not on the amount of credit petitioned or awarded.
    8. Personnel involved in the assessment of PLA portfolios receive adequate training.
    9. Assessment programs are regularly monitored, reviewed, evaluated, and revised.
  2. PLA portfolio development is a time intensive project, and the course, PLA 300: Prior Learning Portfolio Development, guides students through the process. PLA 300 prepares students to build and submit portfolios to petition for the awarding of college-level credit for experiential learning.
    1. To begin the process, a student must request approval to pursue credit through the PLA portfolio process by submitting to the testing officer: 1) the Request to Pursue Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Portfolio Credit form, 2) a current résumé, and 3) a syllabus for the course for which the student intends to submit a portfolio. The appropriate faculty assessor, department head, and dean will make a decision on the student’s request within two weeks of submission. The decision will be communicated to the student by the testing officer.
    2. If the student’s request to pursue credit through the PLA portfolio process is approved, and if the student has not earned credit for PLA 300, the student must successfully complete PLA 300 prior to submitting a portfolio for review. Successful completion of PLA 300 does not ensure the student’s submitted portfolio will meet current guidelines nor does it guarantee the awarding of credit for the submitted portfolio.
    3. Once PLA 300 has been successfully completed and the student has paid the $150 portfolio evaluation submission fee, the student can then submit the portfolio for evaluation to the testing officer. The portfolio must follow the University’s PLA portfolio guidelines in place at the time of submission. To ensure that the portfolio will be evaluated prior to the end of the term in which it is submitted, the portfolio must be submitted to the testing officer no later than mid-term of the regular term as specified on the University calendar. The student must pay a non-refundable portfolio evaluation submission fee of $150 for each portfolio submitted.
    4. The testing officer will submit the portfolio to the head of the department offering the course for which PLA portfolio credit is sought. The department head will then submit the portfolio to an appropriate faculty assessor who will evaluate the portfolio for consideration of college-level credit by using the University-approved rubric.
    5. Within four weeks of the date of submission of the portfolio to the testing officer, the faculty assessor, with approval of the appropriate department head and dean, will complete the evaluation of the portfolio and make one of three decisions: award credit, deny credit, and request minor revisions. The testing officer will then communicate the results and return the portfolio to the student. If the portfolio is returned to the student for minor revisions, the student must return the modified portfolio by the specified deadline or the resulting decision will be to deny credit.
    6. If credit is awarded, the testing officer will submit the necessary documentation to the director of advanced placement for processing.
  3. Students who elect the PLA portfolio method must adhere to the following criteria when petitioning for credit:

    1. Petitioned credit does not duplicate previously awarded credit.
    2. Petitioned credit cannot be met by other existing prior learning assessment opportunities.
    3. Petitioned credit must meet unfilled requirements within the degree plan.
    4. Petitioned credit must match a current McNeese course, meaning that students can only petition for credit based on course descriptions and syllabi from McNeese State University.
    5. Petitioned credit is based on college-level learning.
    6. Petitioned credit may not be for a course that was previously denied credit through the PLA portfolio.

StraighterLine Courses

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Students can earn college credit for approved courses successfully completed through StraighterLine located at www.straighterline.com. Official transcripts must be sent directly from StraighterLine to the Office of the Registrar for the awarding of credit. Prior to enrolling in a StraighterLine course, a student should consult with his/her academic advisor to determine applicability of the course to the student’s degree plan.

Enrollment Information

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Registration and Adding/Dropping Courses

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  1. Students are encouraged to plan coursework in consultation with academic advisors; however, each student must assume the responsibility of registering each semester according to the appropriate curriculum requirements.
  2. Students should only enroll in courses for which they are willing to dedicate the time and resources required for successful completion.
  3. No student may attend class until the instructor has verified registration on the official class roster.
  4. A student is considered to be officially registered only after tuition and fees have been paid to the University.
  5. Students may drop and add courses during all registration periods. When a course is ‘dropped’, it no longer appears on the student’s record and is not included in the tuition and fees.
  6. Students who register for classes and decide not to enroll must drop their classes. Students should not assume that the University will drop classes for non-attendance or non-payment. Failure to drop classes may result in failing grades.

Auditing Classes

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  1. Students who do not desire college credit must register to audit.
  2. Classes for audit count in total hours to determine fees owed but do not count toward full-time status.
  3. Changes from audit to credit or from credit to audit must be completed at the Office of the Registrar.
  4. Changes from audit to credit or from credit to audit are not permitted after late registration ends.
  5. Students wishing to change from audit to credit must meet admission and course requirements.
  6. Admission to the University and proof of high school graduation, or the equivalent, is required in order to audit an undergraduate class. Admission to the University and a college transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor’s degree is required to audit a graduate class.

Class Attendance Regulations

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Class attendance is regarded as an obligation as well as a privilege, and students are expected to attend regularly and punctually all classes in which they are enrolled. Students enrolled in e-learning classes must log in and participate in course activities. Failure to do so may jeopardize a student’s scholastic standing and may lead to suspension from the University.

  1. Each instructor is encouraged to keep an attendance record for each class. Instructors are required to state in each course syllabus their expectations regarding class attendance and make-up policies. The course syllabus must be distributed during the first week of the semester.
  2. A student must submit excuses for class absences within the time frame specified in the syllabus. If the absence is due to required participation in a University sanctioned event (band trips, special field trips, music performance, athletic team trips, etc.), the student must present an official University excuse signed by the provost.
  3. Students who are absent due to medical issues should present valid documentation signed by a health care provider to the instructor as soon after the absence as possible. The instructor will determine if the absences is excused or unexcused. Medical documentation is subject to verification by the instructor. Proof of medical issues that cause a student to be absent for an extended period must be presented to the instructor as soon as possible after the student receives this diagnosis from a medical professional. The instructor may allow the student to complete exams or assignments in an alternative course format (use of Moodle, use of note takers, independent study, etc.), if appropriate. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor and make arrangements and discuss if options are available to complete the course requirements. Note: An incomplete grade for the course must be in accordance with University policy.
  4. When the excuse is presented to the instructor in the specified time frame, the instructor will provide the student with an opportunity to complete any outstanding work due to the absence. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make arrangements for makeup work or exams. After the student has provided the instructor with an official University excuse, make up assignments or exams should be completed as soon as possible after the absence or when appropriate, prior to the absence.
  5. Instructors will not require a student to make up all exams at once.
  6. Recipients of federal financial aid should contact the Office of Financial Aid and consult the Financial Aid  section of this catalog to understand the implications of withdrawals for non-attendance on funding and the repayment of funding received. Students must also understand that failure to attend class may have a negative impact on TOPS eligibility, private insurance coverage, tax status, or other financial assistance.

Privilege to Graduating Seniors

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  1. Graduating seniors who have a minimum overall GPA of 3.2 on all undergraduate work attempted and lack no more than 30 credit hours to complete baccalaureate degree requirements may be allowed to register for graduate credit. This privilege does not apply to graduate courses offered for the Master of Business Administration degree.
  2. Students pursuing this privilege must obtain approval from their academic department head, their academic dean, and the graduate dean. An approved form verifying that no more than 30 credit hours are lacking to complete baccalaureate degree requirements and confirming a minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.2 must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.
  3. Students may earn no more than 12 graduate credit hours while completing baccalaureate requirements.
  4. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate requirements.
  5. Students retain their undergraduate status until they receive the baccalaureate degree.
  6. While in the concurrent undergraduate/graduate status, students must maintain a minimum overall graduate GPA of 3.0.
  7. This arrangement is to be considered a special privilege to outstanding undergraduate students and does not imply admission to the William J. Doré, Sr. School of Graduate Studies.

Undergraduate Course Load

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  1. Full-time course load: Undergraduate students registered for at least 12 credit hours during a regular semester or a summer session are considered full-time.
    1. Students enrolled in any of the following courses are considered full-time to prevent student loans from entering repayment status, for insurance purposes, and for Citizenship and Immigration Services (SEVIS) reporting: ARED 445, ARED 483, ARED 485, BADM 400, CSCI 399, EDUC 468E, EDUC 468P, EDUC 468S, EDUC 483E, EDUC 483P, EDUC 483S, EDUC 485E, EDUC 485P, EDUC 485S, EDUC 683, EDUC 685, ENGR 350, ENGR 450, ENGR 550, HHP 468, MATH 399, MUED 442, PSYC 606, SPED 468, SPED 488, SPED 610, SPED 611, STAT 399, TECH 250, and TECH 450.
    2. Undergraduate students on an F-1 visa registered for at least six credit hours during a summer session are considered full-time for Citizenship and Immigration Services (SEVIS) reporting.
  2. Part-time course load: Undergraduate students registered for less than 12 credit hours during a regular semester or a summer session are considered part-time.
  3. Full-time and part-time students as defined above are University definitions and not necessarily those of other agencies or organizations.
    1. A student is permitted to represent the University in competitive activity with other institutions only if enrolled as a full-time regular student or as required by the regulations applicable to the competition.
    2. Students who are receiving financial assistance through the Veterans’ Administration or other agencies should determine the number of credit hours necessary to be considered full-time.
  4. For undergraduates, the normal course load is 15 to 19 credit hours for a regular semester and nine for a summer session. The maximum course load is 22 credit hours (18 hours for freshmen advised in the Department of General and Basic Studies) in a regular semester or 12 credit hours in a summer session.
  5. In order to schedule more than the maximum load, an undergraduate student must have a GPA of 3.25 the previous semester or a 3.25 overall GPA. A student wishing to schedule more than the maximum load should contact his/her academic department for the appropriate form and approvals.
  6. The maximum course load for which a student may enroll during an interim period, or pre-session, is three credit hours.

Withdrawal from Courses and Resignation from the University

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  1. After the last day of late registration and through the last day to withdraw from a course, a student can withdraw from a course by completing a Course Withdrawal Form with his/her advisor and submitting the completed form to the Office of the Registrar. The student will then be withdrawn from the course, and a grade of WZ (or W for graduate students) will be assigned. A student who is unable to visit campus to complete this process should contact his/her academic advisor for assistance.
  2. All recipients of federal financial aid who officially withdraw from a class or who unofficially withdraw by discontinuing class attendance are subject to repayment of a portion of funds received.
  3. Although WZ grades do not affect a student’s GPA, excessive course withdrawals reflect negatively on the student’s record, increase the amount of time needed for degree completion, and may result in the loss of scholarships and other types of financial aid. The University assesses a per course withdrawal fee of $50 for excessive course withdrawals beyond an established limit.
    1. An undergraduate student may only withdraw (WZ grade) from six undergraduate courses (numbered 100-499) during his/her academic career at McNeese, without incurring the per course withdrawal fee for excessive withdrawals.
    2. If a student exceeds the specified number of course withdrawals (WZ grades), the student is assessed the course withdrawal fee for each course over the limit. The student must pay the charges prior to submitting the course withdrawal form to the Office of the Registrar for processing.
    3. The following drops and withdrawals are not counted toward the course withdrawal limit:
      1. Course drops during registration where withdrawal grades are not assigned
      2. Any withdrawal before Fall 2013
      3. Withdrawals resulting from resignation from the University (W grades)
      4. Withdrawals resulting from military activation (WM grades)
      5. Withdrawals resulting from administrative action (WX grades)
      6. Withdrawals from ORIN 101
      7. Withdrawals from linked lab sections where no credit or grade is assigned (Ex: BIOL 225 LA - 0 credits)
      8. Withdrawals earned at other institutions
    4. The amount of the per course withdrawal fee for excessive course withdrawals is subject to change without prior notice.
  4. A student who wishes to withdraw from all courses must resign from the University.
  5. Resignations must be received in the Office of the Registrar by the designated date published in the University calendar. A resignation form may be completed at the Office of the Registrar. A student who is unable to visit campus may mail or fax a signed letter of resignation and a copy of a valid photo ID to the Office of the Registrar. Resignations may also be e-mailed to registrar@mcneese.edu from a student’s University e-mail account. The resignation is effective when the letter is received by the Office of the Registrar.
  6. A student who officially resigns from the University prior to a designated date will receive a grade of W in all courses; however, if a student previously withdrew from any courses, the assigned grade of WZ will not be replaced with a grade of W. Courses with a grade of W are not counted toward the course withdrawal limit.
  7. Grades of F, I, or WN may be recorded for students who leave the University without officially resigning by the designated deadline. A course withdrawal fee of $50 is assessed for every WN grade assigned. This per course fee will automatically be charged to the student’s account when the WN grade is assigned.
  8. The deadline for withdrawing from a course or resigning from the University is approximately 60% into the semester or summer session. The date appears in the University calendar at www.mcneese.edu/schedule and in this catalog. After this date, a student may not withdraw from a course or resign from the University.
    1. In extraordinary cases, a student may appeal to his/her academic dean to withdraw from a course or resign after the published deadline, but before final exams begin. Such cases might include, but are not limited to, job relocation, prolonged medical problems, serious accidents, or death in the immediate family. It is the student’s responsibility to provide documented evidence of the reasons for the request. Extraordinary cases shall not include dissatisfaction with an anticipated grade or a decision to change a major. Any approved requests must be submitted by the dean to the Office of the Registrar prior to the beginning of the final exams. Course withdrawals approved by the dean will count toward the course withdrawal limit. Any student exceeding the course withdrawal limit must pay the per course withdrawal fee before the Office of the Registrar will process the request.
    2. Retroactive withdrawal after a semester ends may be permitted only by approval of a student appeal. Information and appeal forms for undergraduates may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. A non-refundable fee must be paid prior to filing the appeal. Course withdrawals approved by the retroactive withdrawal committee will count toward the course withdrawal limit. Any student exceeding the course withdrawal limit must pay the per course withdrawal fee before the Office of the Registrar will process the approved withdrawals.

Withdrawal from Courses for Non-Attendance

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  1. If a student receives unexcused absences in excess of ten percent of total classes, an instructor may assign a WN (withdrawal for non-attendance) as a final grade. Additionally, if a student’s excused and unexcused absences exceed 40% of total classes, an instructor may assign a WN as a final grade.
  2. Because individual instructors may or may not choose to implement this policy, a student who stops attending classes or participating in e-learning activities for online classes should not assume that a WN will automatically be assigned.
  3. Instructors using the withdrawal for non-attendance policy must clearly state so in the course syllabus and must either supply students with a copy of the policy or provide the web link through which students can access the policy online. The course syllabus must be distributed during the first week of the semester.
  4. Students are responsible for understanding attendance expectations as noted in the syllabus for each class in which they are enrolled; they are responsible for monitoring their own status with regard to absences and should communicate with their instructors as to whether specific absences are excused or unexcused. Students who do not comply with the withdrawal for non-attendance policy in a class in which the instructor has opted to implement it may receive a grade of WN despite any other grades earned in that class.
  5. A course withdrawal fee of $50 is assessed for every WN grade assigned. This per course fee is automatically charged to the student’s account when the WN grade is assigned.
  6. Recipients of federal financial aid should contact the Office of Financial Aid and consult the Financial Aid  section of this catalog to understand the implications of withdrawals for non-attendance on funding and the repayment of funding received. Students should also understand that failure to attend class may have a negative impact on TOPS eligibility, private insurance coverage, tax status, or other financial assistance.

Academic Probation and Suspension

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There are three categories of academic status: 1) academic good standing and eligible to be enrolled; 2) academic probation and eligible to be enrolled; and 3) academic suspension and not eligible to be enrolled. Academic standing notations appear on the academic transcript. Although students will usually receive official email notification of academic status, such notice is not a prerequisite to students being placed in one of the above categories. Students have the responsibility to ascertain their academic status prior to the beginning of the next enrollment period. Colleges within the University may set higher academic status rules.

Academic Probation

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  1. A student is placed on academic probation when the overall GPA is below 2.0.
  2. Once on academic probation, the student remains on probation as long as each term GPA is at least 2.0.
  3. Once the overall GPA is 2.0 or higher, the student is placed in academic good standing.
  4. Transfer students may be admitted on academic probation, pending receipt of credentials to determine academic status.

Academic Suspension

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  1. A student on academic probation is suspended when the term GPA falls below 2.0. First-time freshmen admitted in good standing are not be suspended prior to the completion of two semesters of enrollment.
  2. The first academic suspension is for one regular semester. A student suspended for the first time at the end of the spring semester may attend the summer session without appeal.
    1. If the overall GPA is raised to 2.0 or higher as a result of academic work completed during the summer session, the student is placed in academic good standing, and the suspension is lifted. The student may then attend the fall semester without appeal.
    2. If the overall GPA is not raised to 2.0 or higher as a result of academic work completed during the summer session, the suspension for the fall semester is in effect. In this case, only one suspension is counted.
  3. A second or subsequent academic suspension is for one calendar year. A student suspended for a second or subsequent time at the end of the spring semester may also attend the summer session without appeal.
  4. A student suspended at the end of any term or semester may appeal to his/her college appeals committee to be readmitted. The appeal process is online and can be accessed through Banner Self-Service. The committee may grant or deny a student’s appeal, and the committee’s decision is final.
  5. A suspended student may not enroll in another university within the University of Louisiana System while the suspension is in effect, but may enroll in a community college. To ensure minimal or no loss of credits upon return to the University, it is recommended that the student consult with his/her academic advisor regarding the choice of courses to be taken at the community college. Credits earned under these conditions may be accepted for a degree at McNeese provided grades of C or higher are earned in each of the courses to be transferred.
  6. Registration will be cancelled for a student who registers during regular registration (prior to the end of a semester or summer session) and is then suspended.
  7. A transfer student under academic suspension for a specified period will not be admitted until that period has ended. A transfer student suspended for an indefinite period of time may be considered for admission only after such intervals of time would have elapsed had the suspension been incurred at McNeese. Transfer students under academic suspension who have at least a 2.0 overall GPA may appeal to enroll at McNeese.
  8. Any student, including suspended students, who did not enroll at McNeese during the preceding semester must submit an application for admission and follow the re-admission requirements set forth for former students. Admission to the University does not constitute acceptance of an academic suspension appeal.

Other Suspensions

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A student may be suspended or expelled from the University for reasons other than poor academic performance. In these cases, if a student is permanently dismissed from the University, the notation “ineligible to enroll” will appear on the student’s academic transcript. If a student is dismissed for a specific period of time, the notation “eligible to return (semester) (year)” will appear on the student’s academic transcript.

Degree and Graduation Requirements

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Academic Terms and Degree Designations

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The Louisiana Board of Regents requires the use of the following academic terms and degree designations:

  1. A degree or certificate is an award conferred on a student upon completion of a unified program of study including a grouping of University-approved courses and requirements.
  2. A degree title is the complete label of a degree program, consisting of a degree designation (e.g., Bachelor of Science) and the degree subject area (e.g., Chemistry).
  3. A degree subject area is the primary discipline which constitutes the focus of a program of study. The degree subject area is the same as the major (e.g., Chemistry, History, Sociology).
  4. A curriculum is a listing of requirements for a degree or certificate: required and elective courses, required program activities, and assessments.
  5. A major is that part of a degree program which consists of a specified group of courses in a particular discipline(s) or field(s), usually consisting of 25% or more of total credit hours required in an undergraduate curriculum.
  6. A minor is that part of a degree program which consists of a specified group of courses in a particular discipline or field, usually consisting of 15% or more of total credit hours required in an undergraduate curriculum.
  7. A concentration is an alternative track of courses within a major, accounting for at least 30% of the major requirements. Example: a concentration in molecular biology within a biology major.

Definitions of Undergraduate Degrees and Certificates

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The Louisiana Board of Regents defines the following undergraduate degrees and certificates:

  1. An associate’s degree (e.g., Associate of Arts, Associate of General Studies) is an academic degree program with a significant general education core, designed primarily to serve as preparatory education for transfer to a related baccalaureate program. All coursework required for the degree must meet SACSCOC requirements. The standard number of total credit hours required for the associate’s degree is 60, while the standard number of credit hours required for the general education core is 27.
  2. A baccalaureate, or bachelor’s, degree (e.g., Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of General Studies) is an academic degree program with a significant general education core. The baccalaureate degree usually emphasizes breadth and depth of study in a recognized academic discipline, may serve as a career entry degree, and should prepare a student for further graduate study. All coursework required for the degree must meet SACSCOC requirements. The standard number of total credit hours required for the baccalaureate degree is 120, while the standard number of credit hours required for the general education core is 39.
  3. A post-baccalaureate certificate (PBC) is an undergraduate academic offering that is earned after a student has already completed a recognized baccalaureate degree. The post-baccalaureate certificate is commonly used as a path for alternate teacher certification and does not require admission to graduate school.

General Graduation Requirements

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Candidates for a degree or certificate must fulfill the following general graduation requirements:

  1. Complete curriculum requirements listed in one issue of the Academic Catalog.
    1. The catalog in effect when the student first registered in that curriculum, at McNeese or at another regionally accredited institution, is followed. However, the student may choose to follow updated curriculum requirements that become effective while enrolled in that curriculum. In the case of a transfer student, supporting documents showing original entry into the program must be furnished.
    2. Students who interrupt their college work for at least one regular fall or spring semester will be required to complete degree requirements in effect at the time of re-entry.
    3. If a student changes to another curriculum and then changes back to the former curriculum, the catalog in effect at the time of returning to the former curriculum is followed.
    4. Students are expected to complete undergraduate degree requirements within ten years. After that time, students become subject to current catalog requirements.
    5. Changes may be made without prior notice, and students may be required to comply with curriculum changes when they become effective.
    6. Updates to a program’s concentration will not change the catalog year of the student’s curriculum requirements, provided the concentration was in place for that catalog year.
    7. A student who adds a concentration that was not in place for his/her catalog year’s curriculum requirements will be required to complete the curriculum requirements from the catalog year establishing the concentration.
    8. In cases where extenuating circumstances exist, exceptions to this policy may be made with approval of the academic department head, dean, and vice president for academic and student affairs.
  2. Have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all courses credited toward the degree, as well as a GPA of 2.0 in work completed at McNeese which is credited toward the degree.
  3. Have a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the courses that apply to the major.
  4. Meet specific departmental requirements.
  5. Complete statewide general education requirements as mandated by the Louisiana Board of Regents.
  6. Clear all University accounts.
  7. File an application for degree at the time of registration for the semester or summer session in which the candidate will complete degree requirements.
  8. Ensure that any transfer credit used toward completion of degree requirements will be received at least 72 hours before commencement.
  9. Be present for commencement exercise unless approval to be absent is given by the University. The request to graduate in absentia can be found at www.mcneese.edu/registrar/graduation.

Associate’s Degree Requirements

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Candidates for an associate’s degree must fulfill the general graduation requirements as well as the following:

  1. Earn in residence at least 25% of the credit hours offered in fulfillment of degree requirements, exclusive of non-traditional credit, such as credit by examination or advanced placement credit.
  2. Complete the final 15 credit hours at McNeese. Any exceptions must have the written approval of the appropriate department head and dean. This requirement is automatically waived for all active-duty service members as well as reservists and National Guardsmen on active-duty.
  3. For active-duty service members enrolled in undergraduate degrees, McNeese limits academic residency to no more than 25% of degree credit hour requirements. Academic residency can be completed at any time while active-duty service members are enrolled. Reservists and National Guardsmen on active-duty are covered in the same manner.
  4. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements.

Bachelor’s Degree Requirements

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Candidates for a bachelor’s degree must fulfill the general graduation requirements as well as the following:

  1. Earn a minimum of 40 credit hours in courses numbered above 300.
  2. Earn a minimum of 12 credit hours in courses numbered above 300 required for the major. Six credit hours of these courses must be earned in residence at McNeese.
  3. Earn in residence at least 25% of the credit hours offered in fulfillment of degree requirements, exclusive of non-traditional credit, such as credit by examination or advanced placement credit.
  4. Complete the final 30 credit hours at McNeese. Any exceptions must have the written approval of the appropriate department head and dean. This requirement is automatically waived for all active-duty service members as well as reservists and National Guardsmen on active-duty.
  5. For active-duty service members enrolled in undergraduate degrees, McNeese limits academic residency to no more than 25% of degree credit hour requirements. Academic residency can be completed at any time while active-duty service members are enrolled. Reservists and National Guardsmen on active-duty are covered in the same manner.
  6. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements.

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Requirements

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Candidates for a post-baccalaureate certificate (PBC) must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Have a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the certificate. For an initial teacher certification PBC, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 on all courses credited toward the certificate.
  2. Earn at least 33% of the total credit hours required for the PBC at McNeese. For a PBC in a teacher education discipline, earn at least 12 of the total credit hours required for the PBC at McNeese.

While post-baccalaureate certificate curricula are comprised of undergraduate coursework, an academic department may substitute previously completed graduate coursework for undergraduate PBC requirements.

Students completing a PBC shall receive an appropriate diploma, and the awarding of the certificate will be noted on the academic transcript. Students receiving a PBC do not participate in commencement and are not listed in the commencement program.

Minors

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  1. A minor is part of a baccalaureate degree program which is comprised of a specified group of courses in a particular discipline or field, consisting of 18-27 credit hours with a minimum of six credit hours at the 300-level or above. A grade of C or better must be earned in each course applied to the minor. Twenty-five percent of the credit hours required for the minor must be earned at McNeese.
  2. Minors may be offered in various departments. Some departments may have academic requirements which must be met prior to declaring a minor in a specific discipline.
  3. Students interested in completing one or more minors should consult their advisor. Additional counsel should be sought from the department offering the minor. Students are encouraged to seek advice and information about potential areas of study early in their academic planning.
  4. A student must earn a minimum of 30 credit hours before declaring a minor; however, minors should be declared prior to completing 90 credit hours.
  5. Courses constituting a minor may be used to satisfy the requirements of the baccalaureate degree program.
  6. Requirements for a minor must be approved by the department head and the dean of the college offering the minor. Any substitutions for courses in a minor must be approved in advance by the department head and the dean of the college offering the minor.
  7. All requirements for minors must be completed before graduation. A minor will be posted on the academic transcript when the degree is completed. Once the baccalaureate degree is awarded, a minor cannot be added.
  8. A minor cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has already earned a baccalaureate degree or double major.

Additional Degree, Majors, and Concentrations

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Additional Degree
  1. To receive a second bachelor’s degree, a student must earn an additional 30 credit hours and 60 quality points beyond the first bachelor’s degree and meet all requirements for the second bachelor’s degree. The second bachelor’s degree cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has previously earned a bachelor’s degree or double major.
  2. To receive a second associate’s degree, a student must earn an additional 15 credit hours and 30 quality points beyond the first associate’s degree and meet all requirements for the second associate’s degree. The second associate’s degree cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has previously earned an associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, or double major.
  3. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements.
Additional Major
  1. Requirements for an additional, or double, major, consisting of at least 30 credit hours, must be approved by the department head and the dean of the college of the appropriate academic curriculum.
  2. Any substitutions for courses in a double major degree plan must be approved in advance by the department head and the dean of the college of the appropriate academic curriculum.
  3. All requirements for a double major must be completed prior to graduation. A double major will be posted on the academic transcript when the degree is completed. Once the degree is awarded, a double major cannot be added.
Additional Concentration
  1. A student interested in completing more than one concentration within the major should consult his/her academic advisor and complete the appropriate paperwork.
  2. All requirements for an additional concentration must be completed prior to graduation. An additional concentration will be posted on the academic transcript when the degree is completed. Once the degree is awarded, an additional concentration cannot be added.
  3. Once a student has earned a degree in a specific major, the student cannot receive the same degree and major, even if the intent is to earn an additional concentration.