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    McNeese State University
   
 
  Oct 23, 2017
 
 
    
2009-2010 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Academic Regulations


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Student Rights and Responsibilities

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McNeese State University conducts the tasks of education, research and service on the fundamental assumption that every student who enrolls at the University has a right to a student-centered learning environment that fosters academic excellence and personal success.

Students positively contribute to this environment by maintaining high standards of integrity and ethical honor in all academic work and personal conduct, familiarizing themselves with and adhering to all policies and regulations of the University, promptly fulfilling all academic, contractual, and financial obligations, and actively participating in University life.

Student Rights

Specific rights the University seeks to provide students include:

  • The right to a student-centered education in an environment that promotes academic and personal success.
  • The right of due process and provision for appeal in judicial proceedings for violations of the University’s Code of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity Policy (Code of Student Conduct; Academic Integrity Policy).
  • The right to appeal any sanction of suspension or dismissal from the University lasting more than one year to the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors (UL System Board of Supervisors Rules).
  • The right to prevent disclosure of personal ‘directory’ information by providing written notification to the Registrar (Confidentiality of Students Records, Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act).
  • The right to inspect and review education records and request corrections of records believed to be inaccurate or misleading (Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act).
  • The right to make written complaint of discrimination by a member of the University faculty or staff or a recognized student organization (Diversity Awareness Policy).
  • The right to confidentially discuss concerns regarding possible acts of discrimination with the Vice President of Special Services and Equity, Dean of Student Services, or member of the Counseling Center staff (Non-Discrimination Policy).
  • The right of student representation on search committees considering candidates for employment at the level of dean or vice president (Policy and Procedures for Appointing Hiring Committees for Position of Dean or Vice- President).
  • The right to file a written complaint, through an appropriate vice president of the University, and to receive a written response to the complaint, within prescribed time limits (Faculty Handbook, Section 107, Policy for Review of Complaints).
  • The right of access to certain information technology tools and resources needed to fulfill course requirements while enrolled (Policy for Use of Information Technology Resources).
  • The right to organize interest groups, social and academic fraternities and sororities, and other organizations in order to strengthen the quality of campus life, provide leadership opportunities, and promote involvement in co-curricular learning (Student Organization Handbook).
  • The right of use of certain campus facilities while conducting legitimate business of a recognized student organization (Policy for Use of Campus Facilities).
  • The right to place certain printed material (papers, signs, posters, and banners) at designated locations on the campus (Policy on Placement of Printed Materials on Campus.
  • The right of freedom of expression in student publications within the context of legal and ethical standards of responsible journalism (Policy of Student Publications).
  • The rights of free speech, public demonstrations, distribution of literature, and political campaigning for public office, within the context of certain guidelines pertaining to time, place, and manner of such activities (Public Forum Regulations Policy and Procedure).
  • The right of special provisions pertaining to enrollment and fulfillment of course requirements for certain students called into active duty of the armed forces of the United States (Reservist and National Guard Mobilization/Activation).
  • The right of reasonable accommodations pertaining to verifiable learning disabilities (Policies and Procedures for Students with Learning Disabilities).
  • The right to appeal grades believed to be incorrect (Faculty Handbook Section 315, Grade Appeals Procedures).

Student Responsibilities

Specific responsibilities the University expects students to assume include:

  • Maintaining awareness of and compliance with all policies of the University.
  • Demonstrating honesty and integrity in all academic relationships (Academic Integrity Policy).
  • Abstaining from the unlawful or unauthorized manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of alcohol or other drugs on University property or at any University function (Alcohol and Drug Policy).
  • Avoiding the unauthorized use, possession, or storage of fireworks, firearms, weapons, explosives, paint ball guns and equipment, and hazardous chemicals; avoidance of the possession or use of realistic replicas of weapons (Campus Weapons Policy).
  • Attending class regularly and punctually (Class Attendance Regulations).
  • Using University information technology resources in a responsible, ethical, professional, and legal manner (Policy for Use of Information Technology Resources).
  • Refraining from committing any act that discriminates or harasses another in relation to race, ethnic background, gender, sexual orientation, religion, disability, or age (Diversity Awareness Policy).
  • Reporting hazing in any form to the Dean of Student Services or University Police (Hazing Policy).
  • Ensuring that use of campus facilities by recognized student organizations occurs only for the legitimate conduct of organization business and not as a means of providing free use of space to a non-University affiliated group (Policy for Use of Campus Facilities).
  • Ensuring that events sponsored by recognized student organizations using campus facilities and/or resources are primarily geared toward McNeese State University students (Student Organization Handbook).
  • Ensuring that student-organized events for the purposes of distributing literature and conducting political campaigns, public demonstrations and public speech conform to prescribed regulations and do not interfere with normal University operations (Public Forum Regulations Policy and Procedure).
  • Complying with requirements of the Military Selective Service Act (Selective Service Requirement).
  • Avoiding use of tobacco products in campus buildings or in close proximity to entrances and exits of buildings (Tobacco Use Policy).
  • Reporting instances of direct or eminent physical threat to individuals and property occurring on University owned or controlled property to University Police; reporting violent behavior that does not constitute a direct or eminent physical threat to the Dean of Student Services (Violence Free Workplace Policy).
  • Properly notifying the University Registrar regarding changes in name, address, telephone number and social security number (Address Changes).

Admission to the University

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General Admission Regulations

  1. An applicant must submit the following items:
    1. An application for admission. An application may be obtained from the Enrollment Information Center, the Office of the Registrar, or the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese.edu/admissions/forms.asp.
    2. All transcripts of previous schooling. These records should be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Recruiting by the institutions attended.
    3. Proof of immunization. Louisiana law requires all first-time McNeese students born after 1956 to be immunized against measles, mumps, rubella, and tetanus-diphtheria. Additionally, state law requires all first-time freshmen to be vaccinated against meningitis. The Proof of Immunization Compliance form must be completed and returned to the Office of Admissions and Recruiting before acceptance to McNeese will be granted. The form may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Recruiting, the Office of Student Services, the Watkins Infirmary, or the University’s website at http://www.mcneese.edu/admissions/forms. asp.
    4. A non-refundable application fee of $20.00 (check or money order).
    5. Proof of Selective Service registration. Males 18-25 years old are required to register for the federal draft under the federal Military Service Act and must submit proof of their registration with the Selective Service System.
  2. All records submitted become the property of the University and cannot be returned.
  3. Applications and records should be on file at least 30 days prior to registration. Applications are accepted after this; however, the student should contact the Office of Admissions and Recruiting for further information.
  4. Falsification of any information when applying for admission may result in the refusal of the applicant or dismissal from the University.
  5. If an admission decision can be made, a student may be granted conditional admission for 30 days pending receipt of all required admission documents. Any student whose admission records are still incomplete 30 days after the first day of classes will have transcript and registration holds placed on their records. The registration of students who are granted conditional admission, and upon receipt of transcripts are found to be ineligible for admission, will be cancelled.
  6. An applicant may be denied admission in instances which would be detrimental to the applicant or which would interfere with the capacity of other students to benefit from the educational experience.
  7. The University Admissions Panel automatically reviews the files of all students who are denied admission.
  8. Specific colleges may have additional admission requirements for students enrolling in certain programs. Admission to the University does not guarantee admission to specific degree programs.

Admission Exceptions - In accordance with Board of Regents policy, McNeese State University may admit students, by exception, who do not meet all stated requirements. The University Admissions Panel automatically reviews the files of applicants who are denied admission and may request additional information as part of the review. Admission decisions are based on an evaluation of the applicant’s likelihood of success at McNeese, life achievement, and the enhancement of the University’s demographically diverse student population.

Developmental Courses

To be eligible to enroll in college-level English or mathematics, students must demonstrate readiness for these courses. If readiness is not demonstrated, students must enroll in the required developmental course(s) to prepare them for college-level English and mathematics.

To demonstrate that developmental English is not required, an applicant must meet one of the following:

  1. Have an ACT English score of at least 18;
  2. Have an SAT verbal score of at least 450;
  3. Have successfully completed ENGL 090-Developmental English, or its equivalent at another institution, prior to enrolling at McNeese as a first-time freshman or transfer student; OR
  4. Have successfully completed ENGL 101-English Composition, or its equivalent at another institution, prior to enrolling at McNeese as a first-time freshman or transfer student.

To demonstrate that developmental mathematics is not required, an applicant must meet one of the following:

  1. Have an ACT mathematics score of at least 19;
  2. Have an SAT quantitative (math) score of at least 460;
  3. Have successfully completed MATH 092-Developmental Mathematics, or its equivalent at another institution, prior to enrolling at McNeese as a first-time freshman or transfer student; OR
  4. Have successfully completed MATH 113-College Algebra, or its equivalent at another institution, prior to enrolling at McNeese as a first-time freshman or transfer student.

Prior to Fall 2009, the required mathematics scores for enrollment in college-level mathematics was a minimum score of 18 on the ACT or 430 on the SAT.

Summer Bridge/PASS Program - First-time freshman applicants in need of two developmental courses are not eligible for immediate admission to the University. First-time freshman applicants who meet all other admission requirements, but need two developmental courses, may participate in the summer PASS program by enrolling in one of the required developmental courses. Successful completion of the PASS program fulfills one of the developmental requirements, making the student eligible for immediate admission, provided all other admission criteria have been met.

Definitions of Entry Status

  1. First-time Freshman: Applicant who has never attended any college or university after high school graduation. Also includes those who have only attended McNeese State University during the summer term after high school graduation.
  2. Transfer Student: Applicant who has attended one or more colleges or universities after high school graduation.
  3. Re-entry/Re-admission Student: Applicant who has previously attended McNeese State University.
  4. International Student: Applicant who is not a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident.
  5. Early Admission Student: Applicant who enrolls prior to high school graduation.

Falsification of Information - An applicant or student who is charged with falsifying academic information; forging or altering academic documents; or withholding information related to his or her admission, transfer credits, academic status, records, etc., will be notified to report to the Office of Student Services where the student will be informed of the situation. The Dean of Student Services will then consult with the Director of Admissions or Registrar to determine the appropriate corrective action. After this consultation, the student will be notified accordingly.

Admission Requirements of First-Time Freshmen

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First-Time Freshman Admission Requirements

Graduates of Louisiana High Schools-First-time freshmen who are graduates of Louisiana high schools must meet the following admission criteria:

  1. Completion of the Regents’/TOPS High School Core Curriculum (listed below);
  2. Need no more than one developmental course; and
  3. ONE of the following:
    1. Cumulative high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale as reported by the Department of Education; or
    2. ACT composite score of 20 (SAT score of 940); or
    3. High school rank in the top 50% of the graduating class.
Regents’ (TOPS) High School Core Curriculum
Units Course
4 English I, English II, English III, English IV
1 Algebra I or Integrated Mathematics I
1 Algebra II or Integrated Mathematics II
1 Advanced Math-Pre Calculus, Advanced Math-Functions & Statistics, Algebra III, Applied Mathematics III, Calculus, AP Calculus, Discrete Mathematics, Geometry, Integrated Mathematics III, Pre-Calculus, or Probability and Statistics
1 Biology I or II
1 Chemistry I or II or Chemistry Com
1 Biology II, Chemistry II, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Physical Science, Physics, Physics II, Physics for Technology, AP Physics, or Agriscience I and II (two units)
1 Additional Math or Science: Advanced Math-Pre Calculus, Advanced Math-Functions & Statistics, Algebra III, Applied Mathematics III, Biology II, Calculus, AP Calculus, Chemistry II, Discrete Mathematics, Geometry, Integrated Mathematics III, Physics, Physics II, AP Physics, Pre-Calculus, Probability, and Statistics
1 American History
1 World History, Western Civilization, World Geography, or European History
1 Civics and Free Enterprise (one unit combined), Civics, or AP American Government
1 Fine Arts Survey (or substitute two units of performance courses in music, dance or theater; or two units of visual art; or two units of studio art; or Speech III and IV; or one unit of an elective from among the other subjects listed in this core curriculum)
2 Foreign Language (two units in same language) or American Sign Language I and II
1/2 Computer Science I or II, Business Computer Applications, Computer Technology Literacy, Introduction to Business Computer Applications, or Computer Science Elective (or substitute a 1/2 unit of an approved elective course related to computers; or a 1/2 unit of an elective from among the other subjects listed in this core curriculum)
17.5 Total core curriculum units
Other courses may be acceptable as substitutes for courses in the core curriculum. Contact LOSFA (www.osfa.state.la.us) or your high school guidance counselor for more information on acceptable substitute courses.

Effective with 2008 high school graduates, the core curriculum increased from 161/2 units to 171/2 with an additional Math or Science requirement.

Graduates of Home-School Programs or Out-of-State High Schools-

First-time freshmen who are graduates of home-school programs or out-of-state high schools must meet ALL admission criteria in ONE of the following groups:

Group 1

  1. Completion of the Board Regents’ High School Core Curriculum.
  2. Need of no more than one developmental course;
  3. One of the following
    1. Cumulative high school GPA of 2.0 on 4.0 scale; OR
    2. ACT composite score of 20 (SAT combined mathematics and critical reading score of 940); OR
    3. High school rank in the upper 50% of the graduating class.

Group 2

  1. ACT composite score of 20 (SAT combined mathematics and critical reading score of 940);
  2. Need of no more than one developmental course;
  3. Cumulative high school GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Group 3

  1. ACT composite score of 23 (SAT combined mathematics and critical reading score of 1050);
  2. Need of no more than one developmental course.

Adult Students, Aged 21-24

  1. First-time freshmen aged 21-24 must meet minimum admission criteria as outlined above.
  2. First-time freshmen aged 21-24 who do not meet minimum admissions criteria may be admitted to the University in one of the following two ways:
    1. Enroll as a part-time degree seeking student. Students admitted under this category may enroll for no more than 6 hours in the fall or spring semesters and no more than 3 hours in the summer term. The part-time restriction is removed once the student earns 12-college level hours with an overall GPA of at least 2.0 and demonstrates that both developmental English and mathematics are not required.
    2. Enroll as a non-degree seeking student through the EASE program. EASE students are not eligible for financial aid or veterans’ benefits. A student may transfer to a degree program and degree-seeking status once he/she earns 12- college level hours with an overall GPA of at least 2.0 and demonstrates that both developmental English and mathematics are not required.
  3. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions.

Adult Students, Aged 25 or Older

  1. First-time freshmen aged 25 or older must have received a high school diploma or GED or have an ACT composite of 18.

Other Categories of First-Time Freshmen

First-time freshmen who do not meet the criteria outlined above are encouraged to apply. McNeese may admit students by exception; however, admission exceptions are limited and are awarded on a competitive basis.

First-Time Freshman Admission Regulations

  1. An applicant should file for admission as described under General Admission Regulations.
  2. A high school senior is urged to submit an application for admission, application fee, and proof of immunization form as soon as possible after completion of the junior year.
  3. For applicants who graduated from public Louisiana high schools May 2003 or later, high school records will be accessed through the electronic Student Transcript System (STS), negating the need for submission of high school transcripts. All other applicants must have a complete high school or home school transcript sent from the high school to the Registrar’s Office.
  4. Entering freshmen must have official ACT or SAT scores sent directly from the testing agency to McNeese (ACT College Code 1594/SAT College Code 6403). Since these scores are used for admission, scholarship evaluation, and placement in certain classes, students should have scores sent prior to enrolling. Registration forms for these examinations are available from most high schools or from the McNeese Office of Scholarships and Testing. ACT score reports may be requested by writing: ACT Records, P.O. Box 451, Iowa City, IA 52243; or by calling: (319) 337-1313. SAT score reports may be requested by writing: SAT College Board ATP, P.O. Box 6201, Princeton, NJ 08541; or by calling: (800) SAT-SCORE.
  5. An applicant who earned a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) must have an official report of test results sent directly from the State Department of Education to the Registrar’s Office.

Admission of Transfer Students

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Transfer Admission Requirements

  1. Transfer students who have earned 12 or more college-level credit hours must either have earned a transferable Associate degree or higher from an accredited institution OR meet the following admission criteria:
    1. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on all college-level courses;
    2. Be eligible to return to the institution from which they are transferring; AND
    3. Have need of no more than one developmental course at the time of enrollment at McNeese.
  2. Transfer students who have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on all college-level courses, but who have earned less than 12 college-level credit hours, must meet first-time freshman admission criteria in addition to the transfer admission criteria listed above.
  3. Transfer students who do not meet the criteria listed above are encouraged to apply. McNeese may admit students by exception; however, admission exceptions are limited and are awarded on a competitive basis

Transfer Admission Regulations

  1. A transfer student should file for admission as described under General Admission Regulations.
  2. Some transfer articulation agreements exist between McNeese State University and other colleges and universities in Louisiana. These agreements outline the correlation between McNeese courses and courses from other institutions. To aid students transferring within the state, the Louisiana Board of Regents and state institutions developed a course articulation agreement, which can be viewed at http://www.regents.state.la.us/Reports/datapub.htm.
  3. A transfer student under academic suspension for a specified period will not be admitted until that period has ended. A transfer student suspended for an indefinite period of time may be considered for admission only after such intervals of time would have elapsed had the suspension been incurred at McNeese. Transfer students under academic suspension who have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA may appeal to enroll at McNeese.
  4. Students who cannot furnish official transcripts are not eligible to enroll.
  5. Transcripts for transfer applicants who apply but do not enroll are destroyed.

Admission of Visiting Students

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  1. A visiting student is a student who attends McNeese, usually during a summer term or interim session, while pursuing a degree at another institution. The intent of a visiting student is to transfer credit earned to his/her home institution.
  2. Visiting students are not regularly admitted to the University, not eligible for financial aid, and not approved to pursue a curriculum.
  3. Visiting students must submit: (1) an application for admission; (2) a non-refundable application fee of $20; and (3) immunization records. Males aged 18-25 must submit proof of Selective Service (draft) registration.
  4. Transcripts from other institutions are not required for admission; however, transcripts and ACT/SAT scores may be required for placement into certain courses.
  5. Enrollment as a visiting student is limited to the term or session for which the application is received.
  6. If a visiting student wishes to transfer to McNeese, the transfer admission process must be followed, and all transfer admission requirements must be met.

Re-Admission of Former Students

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  1. A former undergraduate student who did not enroll at McNeese during the preceding calendar year must submit an application for admission and a non-refundable application fee of $20.00.
  2. An official transcript from each institution attended since last attending McNeese must be sent directly from the institution to the Office of the Registrar.
  3. Former students must be eligible to return to the last institution attended.

Admission of International Students

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International First-Time Freshman Admission Requirements

An international student applying for admission as a first-time freshman must meet the following criteria:

  1. Graduation from a recognized secondary school comparable to a U.S. high school;
  2. English language proficiency as specified under International Admissions Regulations;
  3. Need of no more than one developmental course; AND
  4. ONE of the following:
    1. Minimum high school GPA of 2.25 as calculated by the Office of International Student Affairs OR
    2. Minimum high school GPA of 2.0 as calculated by the Office of International Student Affairs and minimum composite ACT score of 20 (SAT score of 940).

An international student who graduated from a state-approved U.S. high school must meet the first-time freshman admission criteria outlined here.

International Transfer Admission Requirements

  1. International Transfer Admission Requirements:
    1. Graduation from a recognized secondary school comparable to a U.S. high school;
    2. English language proiciency as speciied under International Admissions Regulations;
    3. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.25 on all college-level courses as calculated by the Ofice of International Student Affairs;
    4. Be eligible to return to the institution from which they are transferring; AND
    5. Be in need of no more than one developmental course at the time of enrollment at McNeese.
  2. International transfer students who have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.25 on all college-level courses, but who have earned less than 12 college-level credit hours, must meet international first-time freshman admission criteria in addition to the international transfer admission criteria.

International Admission Exceptions - An international applicant who is denied admission may appeal to the University Admissions Panel. In accordance with Board of Regents policy, McNeese State University may admit students by exception who do not meet all stated requirements; however, the U.S. Federal Regulations prohibit students on F-1 visas from being conditionally admitted.

International Admission Regulations

  1. The following materials are required of ALL international applicants:
    1. Application for admission. The international student application may be obtained from the Office of International Student Affairs, the Office of the Registrar, or the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese.edu/international.
    2. A non-refundable application fee of $30 (check or money order). Checks must be drawn on a U.S. bank.
    3. Affidavit of financial support. This form may be obtained from the Office of International Student Affairs, the Office of the Registrar, or the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese.edu/international. A bank statement or official bank letter must accompany the affidavit of financial support and must reflect the minimum balance required as determined by the Office of International Student Affairs. (The affidavit of financial support requirement only applies to applicants seeking to enroll while in F-1 visa status.)
    4. English language proficiency documentation. Official TOEFL, IELTS, or ACT/ SAT scores must be sent directly from the testing agency to the University.
    5. Complete, official secondary school and college transcripts. All documents must be properly attested by either the registrar, attestation officer, controller of examinations, or high school principal. The transcript must be in English or accompanied by an official line-by-line English translation.
  2. All items listed above should be on file by the following dates:
    1. March 15 for the summer semester;
    2. May 15 for the fall semester;
    3. October 15 for the spring semester.

    Priority will be given to applicants who have provided all application materials by the stipulated deadlines.

  3. An applicant whose native language is not English must demonstrate English proficiency. English proficiency may be demonstrated by one of the following:
    1. Minimum TOEFL score of 500 on the paper-based exam, 173 on the computer- based exam, or 61 on the Internet-based exam;
    2. Minimum IELTS band score of 5.0;
    3. Completion of the advanced level of the on-campus ESLI University Language Center program;
    4. Minimum ACT English score of 21 or SAT Verbal score of 500 and approval of the International Student Affairs Officer;
    5. Successful completion of one full academic year at a recognized U.S. college or university;
    6. Diploma from a state-approved U.S. high school (earned upon successful completion of required state curricula); OR
    7. Satisfactory rating in a documented personal interview with the International Student Affairs Officer. (Interviews will be granted on a discretionary basis.)

    Information about the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), which is administered in many cities of the world, may be obtained by writing: TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540; or by visiting their Web site: http://www.toefl.org. Information about the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) may be obtained by writing: IELTS, Inc., 100 East Corson Street, Suite 200, Pasadena, California 91103; or by visiting their Web site: http://www.ielts.org. An applicant is responsible for making testing arrangements with the agency administering the exam.

  4. The following will be considered in determining the eligibility of both international transfer and first-time freshman students: secondary and post-secondary grades; subjects taken; ability to carry a full course of study; English proficiency; standardized test scores; and the student’s major field of study in relation to his or her ability. McNeese must certify that each student has the scholastic preparation to succeed; therefore, certain students meeting admission criteria may be denied admission if the Registrar, International Student Affairs Officer, Dean of Enrollment Management, academic dean, or department head agree (based on other information in the students’ academic records) that the students probably will not succeed in their chosen curricula at McNeese.
  5. When all required admission information is received in the Office of International Student Affairs, the records will be carefully evaluated. If all admission requirements are met, a notice of acceptance and a SEVIS Form 1-20 will be issued. (The SEVIS Form I-20 is only issued to those applicants seeking to enroll while in F-1 visa status.) If all admission requirements are not met, the applicant will be notified so that alternate plans can be made.
  6. All test scores required for the purpose of admission must be submitted directly to McNeese State University by the appropriate testing agency.

English as a Second Language International (ESLI) University Language Center - The ESLI University Language Center, a privately owned and operated ESL program located on the McNeese campus, provides students intensive English training in preparation for entrance to the University. Students may enroll and begin study in ESLI courses at any time during the fall, spring, or summer semesters. Upon successful completion of the advanced level of the ESLI program, the student may be admitted to the University without submission of TOEFL scores, provided all other requirements for admission are met. Tuition and fees for ESLI programs may differ from McNeese State University tuition and fees.

The ESLI program is intensive with 25 hours of instruction each week in reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar, and intensive skills with a focus on pronunciation, vocabulary, note taking, and test taking. ESLI techniques provide students with cultural context by involving them in academic excursions, conversation partners, friendship families, and recreational activities. The director and teachers assist students in airport pick-up, banking, and general orientation. All activities are part of the interactive immersion in the ESLI program. For further information and application packets, prospective students should contact the ESLI University Language Center at (360)724-0547 or visit their Web site at www.esli-intl.com.

Early Admission of High School Students

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  1. McNeese offers early admissions programs for students who have not yet graduated from high school: High School Dual Enrollment Program; Full-time Early Admissions Program; and Exceptional Scholars Admission Program.
  2. Under these programs, students are enrolled in regular McNeese courses, and all credits attempted and earned become part of the University’s permanent record. College credits earned may be used to satisfy degree requirements at McNeese.
  3. Transfer of credit earned under an early admission program is dependent upon the policies of the receiving institution.
  4. Early admission students are subject to the rules, regulations, and policies for all students at McNeese.
  5. Students wishing to enroll must meet admission requirements of the specific program as outlined below. Additionally, when registering for specific courses, the student must meet all course enrollment requirements.
    1. High School Dual Enrollment Program
      1. Students who wish to enroll at McNeese while continuing their enrollment in high school may do so under the High School Dual Enrollment Program. To enroll through this program, a student must meet the following requirements:
        1. Be currently enrolled in the 11th or 12th grade at a public or private Louisiana high school;
        2. Be on track for completing the Regents/TOPS high school core;
        3. Have a cumulative 2.75 grade point average as calculated by the high school;
        4. Have a minimum composite score of at least 17 on the PLAN or 18 on the ACT (scores must be on file at the high school);
        5. Be in good standing as defined by the high school; and
        6. Have permission from the high school to participate.
          Additionally, to enroll in English 101, the student must have a PLAN or ACT English sub-score of at least 18, and to enroll in Mathematics 113, a PLAN or ACT mathematics sub-score of at least 19 is required.
      2. To apply, students should submit a completed High School Dual Enrollment Initial Application form to the Office of Continuing Education. A High School Dual Enrollment Continued Participation form is also required for each subsequent term of enrollment.
      3. To continue enrollment in subsequent semesters/terms through this program, the student must have successfully completed prior Dual Enrollment Program courses. If the student resigns or withdraws from a course, the student must receive permission from both the high school and college to continue enrollment in the subsequent semesters/terms.
      4. Students admitted under this program may receive high school credit for University courses as outlined in dual credit agreements between McNeese and local school boards. Questions regarding this option should be directed to the high school principal or counselor.
      5. For students enrolled in summer courses through this program, dormitory facilities may be available for those who are eligible to live on campus.
    2. Full-time Early Admissions Program
      1. The full-time early admissions program was established by the Legislature and the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education; therefore, the program is open only to students enrolled in state-approved high schools. High school students who wish to complete their senior year requirements by attending McNeese may enroll by meeting the following requirements:
        1. Completion of six semesters of high school;
        2. Recommendation of the high school principal;
        3. Minimum unweighted GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; AND
        4. Minimum ACT composite score of 25
      2. Students should file for admission as described under General Admission Regulations and should submit a complete Recommendation for Full-time Early Admission of the High Ability Student Form.
      3. Upon successful completion of 24 semester hours of college work, students admitted under this program may be granted a state of Louisiana high school diploma by the appropriate school board.
    3. Exceptional Scholars Admission Program
      1. The Exceptional Scholars Admission Program (ESAP) is open to students enrolled in state-approved high schools who have documented evidence of exceptional intellectual or creative abilities. The program allows students who are not of the traditional classification required for the Part-time or Full-time Early Admission Programs to enroll in college-level courses.
      2. Program guidelines require that an applicant meet the following criteria:
        1. Minimum unweighted high school GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale;
        2. Minimum ACT composite score of 25 (SAT of 1130);
        3. Written recommendation from his/her high school principal or counselor; AND
        4. Written permission from a parent or legal guardian.

Admission Regulations

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Academic Bankruptcy - At the time of application for first-time admission or re-admission to the University (and prior to the final exam period for the first term of enrollment or re-enrollment), undergraduate students may file a Petition for Academic Bankruptcy. Academic Bankruptcy provides students a fresh start academically by allowing them to gain admission to the University as an entering freshman with no hours earned, no credits attempted, and no GPA. A minimum of three years must have passed between the end of the semester in which the student was last registered for credit at any college or university and the beginning of their enrollment under Academic Bankruptcy at McNeese.

Students filing Academic Bankruptcy are admitted to the department of General and Basic Studies and transferred out only upon successful completion of all Basic Studies requirements. Although no courses which were previously taken, whether passed or failed, will be counted in the student’s grade-point average or toward graduation, the courses and grades will still appear on the student’s scholastic records and transcripts.

To fairly determine graduation honors, McNeese considers the entire academic record of each student, including credits attempted and earned prior to filing Academic Bankruptcy. Students should also be aware that, when considering applications for admission, many undergraduate professional curricula and most graduate and professional schools compute the undergraduate grade-point average on all hours attempted. Once filed and approved, the Academic Bankruptcy decision is irreversible. Additional information on Academic Bankruptcy may be obtained by calling the Assistant Director of Admissions at (337) 475-5148.

Auditing Classes - Students who do not desire college credit must register to audit. Proof of high school graduation, or the equivalent, is required in order to audit an undergraduate class. A college transcript indicating receipt of a bachelor degree is required to audit a graduate class. Classes for audit count in total hours to determine fees owed but do not count toward full-time status. Students wishing to change from audit to credit must meet admission and course requirements. Changes from audit to credit or from credit to audit are not permitted after late registration ends.

EASE (Emphasis on Special Entry) - EASE is a simplified admission and registration procedure. The following are eligible to apply through EASE:

  1. Adults age 60 or older;
  2. Adult students aged 25 or older who have obtained a high school diploma or GED and have never attended a college or university;
  3. Former McNeese students; AND
  4. Students with a bachelor’s degree who (1) are non-degree-seeking or non-certification- seeking and (2) do not intend to enroll in graduate courses.

Persons seeking financial aid or receiving veterans education benefits or those who do not meet the criteria listed above must enroll through the regular admissions process rather than through EASE.

EASE students are restricted to undergraduate courses for which they have the appropriate prerequisites; courses may be taken for credit or noncredit. For more information, see the Continuing Education section of this catalog or contact the Continuing Education Office at (337) 475-5127.

Transfer Credit Evaluation Process - The prerogative for accepting a course for credit belongs to the institution to which a student transfers. McNeese’s process of evaluating credits from other schools includes the evaluation of course learning objectives and grading policies. The steps in evaluating transfer credit are:

  1. Determine if the institution where the credit was earned is regionally accredited or recognized. To determine accreditation for U. S. schools, McNeese utilizes the publication, Transfer Credit Practices of Designated Educational Institutions. For schools outside the United States, publications from the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and NAFSA: Association of International Educators are utilized. If institutions are not regionally accredited, consideration is given to the transfer credit acceptance recommendations of selected institutions or state educational agencies in the states in which the institutions are located.
  2. If the course work was earned at an institution which awards credit in quarter hours, the credits will be converted to semester hours. (The number of quarter hours multiplied by 2/3 equals the number of semester hours.)
  3. If a school uses a different grading scale or grade designations, the grade will be interpreted according to McNeese policy.
  4. The Office of the Registrar will review the course description, prerequisites, and level and then award credit for acceptable courses. Other materials such as syllabi, exams, and/or faculty credentials may be reviewed to determine if course content and objectives are comparable to the course expectations at McNeese.
  5. Applicability of transfer credit to the student’s McNeese degree program is determined by the student’s academic department.
  6. Lower-division courses (100 and 200) will not transfer as upper-division courses (300 and 400). A lower-division transfer course may be equated to an upper-division McNeese course on a course articulation guide; however, the lower-division transfer course cannot be used to compute the number of upper-division course credits at McNeese.
  7. No credit for remedial or developmental courses will be given at McNeese. Additionally, no credit will be given at McNeese for courses that would not have counted toward a degree at McNeese or at the institution where taken.
  8. Credits earned while under suspension from McNeese or another college or university will not be accepted for credit at McNeese.
  9. McNeese computes the grade-point average on all courses except those with grades of ‘W’, ‘WA’, ‘WB’, ‘WC’, ‘WD’, ‘WS’, ‘WU’, ‘WN’, ‘S’, ‘SP’, ‘U’, ‘P’, and ‘NC’. Incomplete grades are computed in the overall grade-point average if they were included in the grade-point average at the institution attended. The grade of ‘WF’ is computed in the GPA.
  10. Grading systems vary at other colleges and universities. McNeese’s grading system is explained in detail in the McNeese Catalog. Some important calculations that may differ from the prior institution follow:
    1. Grade desginations of “+” and “-” are not recognized.
    2. ‘Pass’, ‘Satisfactory’, and ‘Credit’ will count as earned hours, but not in the computation of the grade-point average (GPA).
    3. ‘Fail’ will count as hours pursued, but not as hours earned, and will be used to compute the cumulative grade-point average.
    4. ‘Unsatisfactory’ or ‘No Credit’ will not count as hours pursued or earned, and will not be used to compute the cumulative grade-point average (GPA).
    5. Other criteria, including high school grades, standardized test scores, and college credit may be used to determine admissibility of courses.
    6. McNeese will compute the GPA for transfer students in the same manner as for McNeese students. All hours pursued and total quality points earned are used to calculate the cumulative GPA.
    7. When students are permitted to repeat courses for credit, only the last grade earned determines acceptability of the course for degree credit.
  11. A student who feels that the evaluation of transfer credit is incorrect should proceed as follows:
    1. Consult the Office of the Registrar to try to resolve the difference.
    2. If the problem is not resolved, the student should file a written appeal with the Office of the Registrar.
    3. A course description and other pertinent documentation of the course(s) in question will be forwarded, along with a request for a recommendation, to the head of the department in which the subject is taught.

Determination of Residence Classification

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The residence status of an applicant or student is determined in accordance with the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors regulations and is based upon evidence provided on the application for admission and related documents. Residence status is determined by Admissions after the completed application for admission has been submitted. The regulations are based primarily on the location of the home and the place of employment. Residence status may not be acquired by an applicant or student while residing in Louisiana for the primary purpose of attending school (i.e., enrolling more than part-time in any semester)..

Residence status, for fee purposes only, will be granted to non-resident graduate students registered for three semester hours or less and undergraduate students registered for six semester hours or less in any session, or all non-resident students enrolled in graduate or undergraduate courses offered through web-based or other electronic instruction, when domiciled outside of the state of Louisiana and not enrolled in any other courses at the university.

For tuition purposes, a resident student is defined as one who has: (1) resided continuously in Louisiana for at least one full year (365 days) immediately preceding the first day of classes of the term for which resident classification is sought; and (2) abandoned all prior domiciles. ‘Domicile,’ as the term is used in the context of residence regulations, is defined as an individual’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation at which the individual remains when not called elsewhere for labor, studies, or other special or temporary purposes, and the place to which the individual returns after an absence. A nonresident student, for tuition purposes, is defined as a student who is not eligible for classification as a resident.

The individual’s physical presence within this state for one year must be associated with substantial evidence that such presence was with the intent to maintain a Louisiana domicile. Physical presence within the state solely for education purposes without substantial evidence of the intent to remain in Louisiana will not be sufficient for resident classification regardless of the length of time within the state.

Residence Regulations

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United States Residents - The following conditions are used in determining residence status:

  1. Applicants living with their parents are classified as residents if the parents have established a bona fide residence in Louisiana. Ordinarily, a parent is considered to have established a residence in Louisiana, if he/she actually resides and is employed full time in the state. A parent who is unable to be employed or who is a housewife may be considered to have established a residence in Louisiana if there is convincing evidence that the person continuously resides in Louisiana. If only one parent qualifies as a resident of Louisiana, the student shall be classified as a resident provided that student resides with the parent who is a resident of Louisiana. An individual who resides in Louisiana and is employed full time in another state may be classified as a resident. In such cases, appropriate documentary evidence must be presented.
  2. Students residing with their parents and enrolling as nonresidents are classified as residents if the parents move to Louisiana and acquire residence as defined in these regulations.
  3. Persons may be classified as residents of Louisiana at the end of twelve consecutive months of residence if they have been employed full time in Louisiana and if during that period they have not been registered more than ‘half-time’ in an educational institution in any semester. Persons who are unable to be employed and who have not been registered in any educational institution for more than six semester hours or its equivalent in any semester may acquire residence in Louisiana if there is convincing evidence that they continuously resided in Louisiana for twelve consecutive months immediately preceding registration.
  4. A student who is married to a Louisiana resident may acquire the residence status of his or her spouse.
  5. Persons who reside in Louisiana for at least two years, exclusive of military service, and who then move to another state or foreign country retain the right to enroll themselves or any dependents as a resident for a period equal to the number of years they resided in Louisiana, but the right shall expire upon the person’s residing for a period of two years in another state or foreign country.
  6. Members of the Armed Forces currently stationed in Louisiana and their dependents shall be classified as Louisiana residents. Military personnel stationed in Louisiana immediately prior to release from active duty may enroll themselves or their dependents as residents during a period not to exceed 6 months after the date of release provided that the term of active duty shall have been no less than 12 consecutive months.
  7. Members of the Armed Forces who were residents of Louisiana immediately prior to entering the Armed Forces retain the right for themselves or any dependents to be classified as residents as long as they are in the Armed Forces and for a two-year period after leaving the Armed Forces.
  8. A resident of Louisiana does not lose the right to be classified as a resident during periods of employment in a foreign country.
  9. An alien who has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence as an immigrant (proof of such status shall be possession of Form I- 551-Alien Registration Receipt Card or passport officially stamped ‘approved as resident alien’) and who has established residence under any of the foregoing provisions shall be declared a resident of the state.
  10. A student may be declared a resident if either parent is a graduate of McNeese. A student who graduates with an associate or higher degree may be classified as a resident for subsequent enrollment at McNeese.

Non-United States Residents

  1. A student who is a non-U.S. citizen may be entitled to resident classification if the student has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence (refugee, spouse of a U.S. citizen, ‘temporary’ or amnesty alien, etc). This granting of resident status for fee purposes shall be in accordance with all applicable laws of the U.S. and relative requirements of the Residence Regulations.
  2. Students and their dependents present in the United States under terms of any one of the following visa classifications who demonstrate a Louisiana domicile for at least one full year (and meet residence regulations) prior to the first day of class of the beginning of the semester will be eligible for an exemption of nonresident fees while holding such a visa:
    1. E visa-Treaty trader or investor
    2. G visa-Representative of international organization
    3. H-1B visa-Temporary worker in a specialty occupation (H-4 dependents may also apply to qualify for exemption.)
    4. I visa-Foreign information media representative
    5. K visa-Fiance’ (Residency approved with proof of marriage to U.S. citizen.)
    6. L visa-Intra-company transferee/foreign employer
  3. Students holding an A visa (government officials) will be immediately eligible for an exemption of the non-resident fees while holding such a visa.
  4. Students holding the following visa classifications are not eligible to establish Louisiana domicile nor be exempted from non-resident fees unless otherwise permitted by law, by system policy, or other regulations:
    1. B visa-Visitor for business/pleasure
    2. C visa-In transit
    3. D visa-Crewman
    4. F visa-Academic student
    5. H visa-Temporary worker (other than H1B)
    6. J visa-Exchange visitor
    7. M visa-Vocational/non-academic student
  5. The domicile of a dependent or an unmarried minor is regarded to be that of the parent with whom such a dependent or minor maintains his/her place of abode.

Residence Regulation Appeals - Any student who feels that he or she has been incorrectly classified as a non-resident may appeal that classification to the Assistant Director of Admissions. Residency forms are available on the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese.edu/admissions/forms.asp. If the appeal is denied, the student can then appeal to the Residency Appeals Committee.

Incorrect Classification - All students classified incorrectly as residents are subject to reclassification and payment of all nonresident fees not paid. If incorrect classification results from false or concealed facts by the student, the student is subject to University discipline.

Non-Resident Fee Waiver

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McNeese Access Award - By approval of the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System, non-resident fee waivers may be granted to new undergraduate students from other states and countries who satisfy the following admission criteria:

Domestic Students:

  1. First-time freshmen (students who have completed less than 12 hours of college-level credit):
    1. ACT composite score of 21 (or equivalent SAT), and
    2. Cumulative high school GPA of 2.25 or higher, and
    3. Have no need for remedial course work. (ACT or SAT scores are needed for determination.)
  2. Transfer students (students who have completed 12 or more hours of college-level credit):
    1. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 on college-level work, and
    2. Be eligible to return to their previous institution, and
    3. Have no need for remedial course work (ACT or SAT scores may be needed for determination.)
  3. Students must be enrolled as full-time students.

International Students:

  1. First-time freshmen (students who have completed less than 12 hours of college-level credit):
    1. Minimum TOEFL score of 525 (paper-based), 195 (computer-based), or 71 (Internet- based), or IELTS Band 6.0, and
    2. Have completed a recognized secondary program comparable to U.S. high school graduation with a cumulative high school GPA of 2.25 or higher, and
    3. Have no need for remedial course work. (ACT or SAT scores are needed for determination.)
  2. Transfer students (students who have completed 12 or more hours of college-level credit):
    1. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 on college-level work, and
    2. Be eligible to return to their previous institution, and
    3. Have no need for remedial course work. (ACT or SAT scores may be needed for determination.)
  3. Students must be enrolled as full-time students.

Students admitted under these criteria will remain eligible to retain this waiver as long as they maintain satisfactory academic progress (2.0 cumulative GPA). Contact the Office of Scholarships and Testing for more information.

Non-Resident Fee Waivers - Non-resident fees can be waived by one of the following:

Group 1. A student applying prior to entering college as a first-time freshman must meet at least four of the following five criteria:

  1. Have a cumulative minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in high school
  2. Have a minimum composite score of 24 ACT/1090 SAT
  3. Rank in the upper ten percent of the high school class
  4. Demonstrate leadership in extracurricular activities
  5. Receive a satisfactory rating in a documented interview (personal or by telephone).

Group 2. A student who has completed less than 24 hours of college credit must meet the criteria in Group I and the 3.0 cumulative and preceding semester minimum grade point average or 2.5 grade point average for performance award of Group 3.

A student who has completed at least 24 semester hours of college credit must meet at least three of the following four criteria:

  1. Have a cumulative and preceding semester minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
  2. Have a GPA that ranks in the upper ten percent of students of the same classification (sophomore, junior, senior) at the awarding institution
  3. Demonstrate leadership in extracurricular activities
  4. Receive a satisfactory rating in a documented interview (personal or by telephone).

Group 3. A student with high achievement in dance performance, debate, visual arts, music performance, or theater performance may be granted a waiver if that student’s presence will improve the educational opportunities of other students. Cheerleaders, flag corps, University recognized or sponsored spirit groups that perform at athletic game activities, and the SGA president may also be considered in this group. The applying student must meet each of the following criteria:

  1. Demonstrate high achievement in the appropriate performance area
  2. Have a cumulative minimum GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in high school, if applying prior to entering college, or on at least 24 hours of college work
  3. Demonstrate leadership
  4. Receive a satisfactory rating in a documented interview (personal or by telephone).
  5. Commit to participate in the appropriate area at the granting institution.

To continue receiving the out-of-state waiver in subsequent semesters, a student in Group 1 or Group 2 above must meet the following criteria:

  1. Maintain status as a full-time student. If the student resigns from the institution during a semester, drops below full-time status, or stays out of school for a fall/ spring semester, the waiver is forfeited for succeeding semesters. Reapplication is possible after the student has completed one full semester (not summer session) of full-time enrollment at the awarding institution with a minimum of 3.0 semester and cumulative GPA. Remaining out of school for summer sessions does not affect waiver status for subsequent semesters; neither does part-time summer enrollment.
  2. Maintain a semester and cumulative 3.0 grade point average. If the semester or cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, the student may retain the waiver for the immediately succeeding semester (summer session), but will forfeit the waiver if the semester or cumulative GPA is below 3.0 at the close of that succeeding semester. The student may reapply for the waiver after any subsequent semester for which the semester and cumulative GPA reach the minimum 3.0.

A student in Group 3 must meet the following:

  1. Maintain satisfactory participation and performance in the appropriate collegiate activity. Failure to maintain satisfactory participation and performance in one semester will result in forfeiting the waiver for subsequent semesters. After reestablishing satisfactory performance for at least one semester (not summer session), the student may reapply for the waiver.
  2. Maintain status as a full-time student. See Group 1 above for procedures if full-time student status is not maintained.
  3. Maintain a semester and cumulative 2.0 grade point average. If the semester or cumulative GPA fall below 2.0, the student may retain the waiver for the succeeding semester, but will forfeit the waiver if the semester or cumulative GPA is below 2.0 at the close of that succeeding semester.

A student granted a waiver is expected to make steady progress toward a degree. In only rare cases will a waiver be granted for more than five academic years.

Additional information may be obtained from the Scholarships and Testing Office, Kaufman Hall, Room 156, or by calling (800) 622-3352, ext. 5140.

Student Responsibility

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Each student is personally responsible for completing all degree requirements established by the University and the appropriate college and department. It is the student’s responsibility to be informed of requirements and any changes which may be implemented. A student’s advisor may not assume these responsibilities and may not substitute, waive, or exempt the student from any established requirement or academic standard.

Degrees

McNeese is authorized by the Louisiana Board of Regents to award associate, bachelor, master, and specialist degrees.

General Information

  1. The regular academic year of nine months is divided into two semesters of approximately fifteen weeks each, the first beginning in August and the second ending in May. A six-week summer session begins soon after the close of the regular academic year and ends in July. Interim sessions may be offered in addition to the two semesters and summer session.
  2. A calendar for the current year may be found near the front of this catalog.
  3. Students are held responsible for rules governing University requirements such as routine registration, academic standards, student activities, and organizations.

Registration

  1. A student’s schedule is planned with his/her faculty advisor. However, each student must assume the responsibility of registering each semester according to the appropriate curriculum requirements.
  2. No student may attend class until the instructor has verified registration with the Office of the Registrar.
  3. A student is considered to be officially registered only after registration fees have been paid to the cashier.

Adding and Dropping Courses

  1. Students are encouraged to plan coursework in consultation with academic advisors. Students should only enroll in courses for which they are willing to dedicate the time and resources required for successful completion.
  2. Students may drop and add courses during all registration periods. When a course is ‘dropped’, it no longer appears on the student’s record and is not included in tuition and fees.
  3. Students who register for classes and decide not to enroll must drop their classes. Students should not assume that the University will drop classes for non-attendance or non-payment. Failure to drop classes may result in failing grades.

Withdrawal from Courses and Resignation from the University

  1. After the last day of late registration and through the last day to withdraw from a course, a student can withdraw from a course by completing a Course Withdrawal Form with his/her advisor and submitting the completed form to the Office of the Registrar. The student will then be withdrawn from the course, and a grade of ‘W’ will be assigned.
  2. All recipients of federal financial aid who officially withdraw from a class or who unofficially withdraw by discontinuing class attendance are subject to repayment of a portion of funds received.
  3. Although ‘W’ grades do not affect a student’s grade point average, excessive course withdrawals reflect negatively on the student’s record, increase the amount of time needed for degree completion, and may result in the loss of scholarships and other types of financial aid. Because of this, the University recommends that a student have no more than 8 course withdrawals in their academic career.
    Classification Hours Earned Maximum Number of Withdrawals
    Freshman 0-29 3
    Sophomore 30-59 2
    Junior 60-89 1
    Senior 90-119 1
    Senior 120 or more 1
  4. A student who wishes to withdraw from all courses must resign from the University.
  5. Resignations must be received in the Of fie of the Registrar by the designated date published in the University calendar. A resignation form may be completed at the Office of the Registrar. A student who is unable to come to campus may mail or fax a signed letter of resignation to the Office of the Registrar. The resignation is effective when the letter is received in the Office of the Registrar.
  6. A student who officially resigns prior to a designated date will receive a grade of ‘W’ in all courses.
  7. Grades of ‘F’, ‘I’, or ‘WN’ may be recorded for students who leave the University without officially resigning by the designated deadline.
  8. The deadline for withdrawing from a course or resigning from the University is approximately 75 percent into the semester or summer session. The date appears in the University calendar, in the schedule of classes, and in this catalog. After this date, a student may not withdraw from a course or resign from the University.
    1. In extraordinary cases, a student may appeal to his/her academic dean to withdraw from a course or resign after the published deadline, but before final exams begin. Such cases might include, but are not limited to, job relocation, prolonged medical problems, serious accidents, or death in the immediate family. It is the student’s responsibility to provide documented evidence of the reasons for the request. Extraordinary cases shall not include dissatisfaction with an anticipated grade or a decision to change a major. Any approved requests must be submitted by the dean to the Registrar’s Office prior to the beginning of the final exams.
    2. Retroactive withdrawal after a semester ends is permitted only by approval of a student appeal. Information and appeal forms for undergraduates may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

Change of Curriculum

  1. A curriculum change form may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The academic department head(s) involved must approve the change. All copies of the completed form must be returned to the Office of the Registrar.
  2. A curriculum may be changed through the last date for late registration for a particular term. Any curriculum change form received after the last date for late registration will be processed for the next semester in which the student enrolls.

Change of Address

  1. A student must provide a current mailing address at the time of admission. If the address changes while the student is enrolled, the new address must immediately be filed in the Office of the Registrar or updated through Banner Self-Service at http://www.mcneese.edu/bannerselfservice/.
  2. A student is responsible for all communications sent to the mailing address currently on file in the offices of the University.

Change of Name

A student wishing to change his/her name on University records because of marriage, divorce, or court order must complete the change of name form in the Office of the Registrar. The student must present official supporting documents for the name change.

Undergraduate Course Load

  1. The normal load is fifteen to nineteen semester hours for a regular semester and nine for a summer session. The maximum course load is twenty-two semester hours of credit in a regular semester or twelve semester hours in a summer session.
  2. In order to schedule more than the maximum load, a student must have a 3.25 grade point average the previous semester or a 3.25 cumulative grade point average. A student wishing to schedule more than the maximum load should contact his/her academic department for the appropriate form and approvals.
  3. The maximum course load for which a student may enroll during an interim period is three semester hours.
  4. Full-time students: Students registered for at least 12 semester hours during a regular semester or at least six semester hours during a summer session.
  5. Part-time students: Students registered for less than 12 semester hours during a regular semester or less than six semester hours during a summer session.
  6. Full-time and part-time students as defined above are University definitions and not necessarily those of other agencies or organizations. Students who are receiving financial assistance through the Veterans’ Administration or other agencies should determine the number of semester hours necessary to be considered full-time.

Classification

  1. Freshmen: Students who have not earned 30 semester hours.
  2. Sophomores: Students who have earned a minimum of 30 semester hours.
  3. Juniors: Students who have earned a minimum of 60 semester hours.
  4. Seniors: Students who have earned a minimum of 90 semester hours.
  5. Preparatory students: Students who are enrolled in high school and college.
  6. Special Undergraduate students: Students not in a degree program, such as visiting or EASE students.

Class Attendance Regulations

Class attendance is regarded as an obligation as well as a privilege, and students are expected to attend regularly and punctually all classes in which they are enrolled. Failure to do so may jeopardize a student’s scholastic standing and may lead to suspension from the University.

  1. Each instructor will keep a permanent record for each class. These records are subject to inspection by appropriate University officials.
  2. Instructors are required to state in their syllabi their expectations regarding class attendance and make-up policies; instructors using the university attendance policy must clearly state so in their syllabi and must either supply students with a copy of the policy or provide the web link through which students can access the policy online. Syllabi must be distributed during the first week of the semester.
  3. A student must submit excuses for all class absences within the time frame specified by the instructor. The instructor will accept an official University excuse. Students must present proof of participation in University-sponsored events which constitute an official excuse for absence from class (band trips, special field trips, athletic team trips, etc.). Each instructor is to determine whether any other absence is excused or unexcused; medical excuses may be subject to verification.
  4. If a student misses an examination, it is the student’s responsibility to present an excuse to the instructor within the time frame specified by the instructor and to arrange a date and place for the examination.
  5. If a student receives unexcused absences in excess of ten percent of total classes, an instructor may assign a ‘WN’ (withdrawal for non-attendance) as a final grade. Because individual instructors may or may not choose to implement this policy, a student who stops attending classes should not assume that a ‘WN’ will automatically be assigned. Students are responsible for understanding attendance policies as noted in the syllabus for each class in which they are enrolled; they are responsible for monitoring their own status with regard to absences and should communicate with their instructors as to whether specific absences are excused or unexcused. Students who do not comply with the attendance policy in a class in which the instructor has opted to implement it may receive a grade of ‘WN’ despite any other grades earned in that class.
  6. If a student’s excused and unexcused absences exceed forty percent of the total classes, an instructor may assign a ‘WN’ for a final grade if the student does not withdraw from the course following established University procedures.

NOTE: All recipients of federal financial aid should contact the Office of Financial Aid and consult the section of the catalog concerning financial aid to understand the implications of these attendance regulations on funding and the repayment of funding received. Students should also understand that failure to comply with these regulations may have an impact on TOPS eligibility, private insurance coverage, tax status, etc.

Examinations - The academic year is divided into two semesters, and final examinations are held at the end of each semester. Students will not be exempted from any final examination. If final examinations for a regular semester do not begin on Monday, a study day is observed one day prior to beginning the examinations. (See University calendar.) If final exams for a regular semester begin on a Monday, no tests are to be scheduled in lecture only day sections for the Thursday and Friday before final examinations. Any exceptions must be approved by the college in which the course is offered.

Credit and Semester Hours - Generally, one credit hour is assigned for 750 minutes of class meeting time or 1500 minutes of laboratory meeting time together with the necessary preparation for a semester. Variations may occur due to the nature of the course. The value of each course of instruction and the amount of work required for graduation is stated in terms of semester hours.

Course-Numbering System - In general, developmental courses are numbered in the 090 series; freshman courses in the 100 series; sophomore courses in the 200 series; junior courses in the 300 series; and senior courses in the 400 series. Courses in the 500 and 600 series are for graduate students only.

TOPS Recipients - Credit received for Advanced Placement, CLEP, and Credit Examinations does not count toward the academic year requirements of 24 earned credit hours for continuation of TOPS award.

Advanced Placement and Credit Examinations

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Students may obtain credit through the following advanced placement and credit examination programs:

  • College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP)
  • McNeese State University Advanced Placement Program
  • College Board College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  • McNeese State University Credit Examinations

Credit earned via advanced placement and/or credit examinations is indicated as such on the student’s transcript. A grade of ‘P’, ‘P-CR’, or ‘CRD’ is awarded, which is included in earned hours, but not in the computation of the grade-point average. Credits earned by advanced placement or credit examinations are not considered in determining academic standing (probation or suspension) at the end of a semester. Whether or not this credit is acceptable toward a degree is determined by the student’s academic department.

College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) - Students who have taken part in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board may receive credit for examinations in which an acceptable score is earned. AP exams that McNeese awards credit for include: Art History, Biology, Calculus AB and BC, Chemistry, Computer Science A and AB, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, English Language, English Literature, French Language, Comparative Government and Politics, US Government and Politics, Latin, Physics B and C, Spanish Language, Statistics, Studio Art, US History, and World History. Students who have participated in this program and who plan to enroll at McNeese should have their AP exam scores sent to the Office of the Registrar (College Code 6403). Additional information on examinations, acceptable scores, and McNeese equivalents may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. - Students who have taken part in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board may receive credit for examinations in which an acceptable score is earned. AP exams that McNeese awards credit for include: Art History, Biology, Calculus AB and BC, Chemistry, Computer Science A and AB, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, English Language, English Literature, French Language, Comparative Government and Politics, US Government and Politics, Latin, Physics B and C, Spanish Language, Statistics, Studio Art, US History, and World History. Students who have participated in this program and who plan to enroll at McNeese should have their AP exam scores sent to the Office of the Registrar (College Code 6403). Additional information on examinations, acceptable scores, and McNeese equivalents may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

McNeese State University Advanced Placement Program

  1. Beginning freshmen with special competence in some subject areas may participate in the University’s advanced placement program in the following ways:
    1. English: Entering freshmen must take the ACT Examination. Students who have an English score of at least 28 and a composite score of at least 28 will be granted credit for ENGL 101. Students who have an English score of at least 32 and combined English and composite scores of at least 60 will receive credit for ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students who have an English score of at least 26, but lower than 28, may elect to take ENGL 102 as their first English. After completion of ENGL 102 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, credit will be granted for ENGL 101.
    2. Foreign Languages: A student with exceptional high school preparation in French, Latin, or Spanish may be enrolled at an advanced level. If the student earns a grade of ‘C’ or better in the advanced course, credit may be awarded in the appropriate lower-level course(s).
    3. Mathematics: All eligible entering freshmen may take the Advanced Placement Test in Mathematics as a part of Freshman Orientation. This test may not be retaken for placement credit. If a student scores on the algebra part of the test at or above the 67th but below the 93rd percentile, the student will be given three semester hours credit for MATH 113. If on the algebra part of the test the student scores above the 93rd percentile, the student will be given three semester hours credit for MATH 170. If a student scores above the 66th percentile on the trigonometry part of the test and also scores above the 67th percentile on the analytic geometry part of the test, the student will be given three semester hours credit for MATH 175. A student may be placed into MATH 190 with an ACT score of at least 27 in Mathematics. Upon completion of MATH 190 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, credit will be granted for MATH 170. Upon completion of MATH 291 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, credit will be granted for MATH 175.
    4. Music: Students who successfully complete special departmental advanced placement examinations in piano may be granted credit for PIAN 115 and PIAN 116.
    5. Keyboarding: Students who have earned one unit in keyboarding in high school may be placed in OSBC 102. Upon completion of OSBC 102 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, credit may be given for OSBC 101.
    6. Nursing: Graduates from a Louisiana or an out-of-state associate degree in nursing or practical (vocational) nursing program who are currently licensed in good standing to practice in Louisiana may be eligible for advanced standing in the ADN or BSN Programs.
      • The LPN seeking an Associate Degree in Nursing will be required to take NUAD 103. If the student receives a grade of ‘C’ or better in NUAD 103, credit will be awarded for NUAD 102 (6 hours) and NUAD 106 (8 hours) for a total credit award of 14 hours.
      • The LPN seeking a BSN degree will be required to take NURS 103. If the student receives a grade of ‘C’ or better in NURS 103,15 credit hours will be awarded for NURS 312, NURS 313, NURS 314, NURS 319 and NURS 418.
      • The student with an ADN seeking a BSN degree will have 40 credit hours awarded for NURS 312, NURS 313, NURS 314, NURS 330, NURS 203, NURS 318, NURS 317, NURS 319, NURS 417, NURS 418, and NURS 423. Three additional hours will be awarded for NURS 326 for ADN graduates from McNeese or those with an equivalent course.
  2. To grant advanced placement based on satisfactory performance at a higher level, the course taken must be the first attempt of an academic course in the discipline granting college credit.
  3. To award credit as outlined above, a student’s academic advisor or department head, or when appropriate the testing officer, must submit the necessary documentation to the Director of Advanced Placement for final approval.
  4. Inquiries about the McNeese State University advanced placement program should be made to the Director of Advanced Placement in General and Basic Studies.

College Board College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Through the College Level Examination Program, a national standardized testing program, both non-traditional and traditional students can earn college credit by examination. Credit will be awarded by the Office of the Registrar for satisfactory scores on the following approved Subject Examinations: American Government, American Literature, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, College Algebra, English Literature, French Language (Level 1 and 2), Freshman College Composition, Information Systems and Computer Applications, Introduction to Educational Psychology, Introductory Psychology, Introductory Sociology, Precalculus, Principles of Accounting, Principles of Macroeconomics, Principles of Microeconomics, Spanish Language (Level 1 and 2), U.S. History I and II, and Western Civilization I and II. Additional information on approved Subject Examinations, required scores, and McNeese course equivalents is available from the Office of the Registrar.

McNeese State University is an official CLEP Test Center (College Code 6403) and offers the examinations at regularly scheduled intervals. Additional information and CLEP registration materials may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Testing.

McNeese State University Credit Examinations

Some students with special training or experience may have acquired the knowledge that could be gained from certain college courses. Some departments may offer such students credit examinations and award college credit for the courses provided the equivalent of a ‘C’ or better is scored on the examinations.

  1. Request forms for credit examinations are issued only if a student has a fundamental knowledge of the subject.
  2. Permission to take a credit examination is granted only to students who are currently enrolled at McNeese.
  3. If a student has ever registered in a course or failed a prior credit examination in the course, a credit examination in the course cannot be taken.
  4. No student may take a credit examination in a course which is a stated or implied prerequisite for an advanced course in the same discipline for which credit has already been earned.
  5. A student or a department can obtain a credit examination request form from the Director of Advanced Placement in General and Basic Studies. Once eligibility for testing is determined based on the four criteria listed above, the form will be signed by the Director of Advanced Placement.
  6. The student must obtain the signature of his/her department head and the signature of the department head in which the course is taught prior to the examination. A fee of $15 is charged for each credit examination. This fee is payable at the Cashier’s window in Smith Hall after the student has obtained all the necessary signatures. The paid Cashier’s receipt must be submitted to the Director of Advanced Placement.
  7. After the testing, the department administering the exam completes the necessary information to request the credit and returns the form to the Director of Advanced Placement.

Credit for Military Training or Experience- A student who has completed four or more months of honorable, federal, continuous active duty may be granted up to two hours in personal fitness and conditioning and two hours in first aid. Additional credit may be given for experience in military occupations and completion of military training as recommended by the American Council on Education in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services. The DD form 214 and other acceptable documents, including official military training transcripts, must be submitted to verify successful completion of the courses. Credit is awarded only in areas currently offered within the University and will not duplicate credit already earned by the student. Any credit awarded is placed on a student’s transcript after one semester of attendance at McNeese. Questions regarding this policy may be directed to the Assistant Registrar, serving as the VA certifying official.

Non-Traditional Credit

  1. A maximum of forty-five semester hours of non-traditional credit, such as extension credit, correspondence credit, military credit, advanced placement credit, credit by examination, and CLEP credit, may be used toward a bachelor’s degree; a maximum of twenty-four hours of non-traditional credit may be counted toward an associate degree.
  2. To ensure that credit for an extension or correspondence course will be counted toward a degree, a student must obtain approval in writing from his/her advisor and department head before registering for the course. A student must take the final examination of a correspondence course under the supervision of the Office of Scholarships and Testing.
  3. To insure that credit earned through CLEP will be counted toward a degree, a student should obtain the approval of his department head before registering for the examination.
  4. After a correspondence course is completed, the student should request the registrar of the college from which the course was taken to send an official transcript of credits to the Office of the Registrar at McNeese. In order for the student to participate in commencement exercises, credit used toward completion of degree requirements must be received at least forty-eight hours before commencement.

Grades

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  1. A student’s scholastic achievement is indicated by the following grades: ‘A’ for work of superior quality; ‘B’ for work of above average quality; ‘C’ for work of average quality; ‘D’ for work of poor but passing quality; ‘S’, ‘SP’, and ‘P’ for work of passing quality; and ‘F’ and ‘U’ for work of unsatisfactory quality.
  2. A grade of ‘I’ (Incomplete) may be given for work which is of passing quality but which, because of circumstances beyond the student’s control, is not complete. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the instructor about receiving an ‘I’ grade. A grade of ‘I’ becomes a grade of ‘F’ if not converted before the specified deadline. The grade of ‘I’ is not included in the computation of the student’s grade-point average until it is resolved into a final grade.
  3. A grade of ‘W’ is given when a student withdraws from a class or resigns after the final date to register and before a designated date specified in the University Calendar. The grade of ‘W’ is not included in the computation of the student’s grade-point average.
  4. A grade of ‘WN’ is assigned by an instructor as a final grade when a student has excessive absences as defined in the Class Attendance Regulations section. The grade of ‘WN’ (withdrawal for non-attendance) is not included in the computation of the student’s grade point average.
  5. Grades that have been submitted to the Office of the Registrar can be changed only by a letter of explanation from the instructor that an error was made. The grade change form must be signed by the instructor and bear the signatures of the instructor’s department head, academic dean, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Grade changes must be made no later than the next regular semester after the grade is earned.

Quality Points and Grade Point Average

  1. The quality of work is indicated by quality points. Quality points are assigned to grades on the assumption that work acceptable for graduation is at least a ‘C.’ A ratio of 2.0 between quality points earned and semester hours taken is a ‘C’ average.
  2. The quality points assigned to each grade are as follows:
    Grade Quality Points Per Credit Hour Grade Quality Points Per Credit Hour Grade Quality Points Per Credit Hour
    A 4 B 3 C 2
    D 1 F 0 WF 0
  3. Grades of ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, ‘F’, and ‘WF’ are included in the cumulative average. ‘WF’ grades were assigned at McNeese prior to Summer 1995. Grades of ‘I’, ‘W’, ‘WN’, ‘S’, ‘SP’, ‘P’, and ‘U’ do not generate quality points and are not included in the cumulative average.
  4. A cumulative average is computed by multiplying the quality points of the grade by the credit hours for each course, adding the results, and dividing the total quality points by the total hours pursued (GPA hours).
  5. The cumulative GPA appears on the student’s transcript. It is used in determining academic standing, honors for graduation, and admission into graduate and professional programs.

Removal of ‘I’ Grades - The grade which removes the ‘I’ must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by a designated date in the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled at McNeese (see University calendar) or within one calendar year if the student does not enroll. At least two weeks before the grade is to be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, the student must make arrangements to complete all course requirements. A grade of ‘I’ becomes a grade of ‘F’ if it is not converted by the deadline.

Students who received an incomplete grade during a previous semester must not re-enroll in the same course. Arrangements for completing work from a previous semester are to be made between the instructor assigning the grade and the student; however, the student may not re-enroll in a course in order to complete work from a previous semester.

Repeating Courses

  1. The last grade earned (excluding withdrawals) stands as the official grade.
  2. Beginning with Summer 1995, all grades for a course (regardless of the number of attempts) appear on a student’s transcript. All hours pursued and total quality points earned are used in calculating the cumulative grade-point average.
  3. For graduation requirements, an adjusted GPA may be used. The adjusted GPA is calculated using only the last grade earned in courses that are repeated; however, the adjusted GPA is not placed on the student’s transcript. For other on-campus purposes, a student may apply to the Registrar’s Office for the calculation of an adjusted GPA.
  4. Colleges may set specific rules regarding admission into and graduation from specified programs in reference to the adjusted GPA.

Final Grades - Final grades may be viewed by accessing Banner Self-Service at http://www.mcneese.edu/bannerselfservice/. A student who requires an official report of grades may request an official transcript from the Office of the Registrar.

Grade Appeals Procedures

A student who feels that the final grade received in a course is incorrect should discuss the matter with the instructor, department head, and college dean. The appropriate steps are as follows:

  1. Instructor: The student should confer with the faculty member who assigned the grade and try to resolve the difference.
  2. Department Head: If the problem is not resolved, the student should submit a written grade appeal to the head of the department in which the grade was assigned. This must be done before the 20th class day of the next regular semester (fall or spring) after the grade was assigned. (The appropriate forms may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.) The department head will investigate the appeal and make a recommendation to the faculty member and the student.
  3. Dean: If either party is dissatisfied with the department head’s recommendation, the appeal is forwarded within 10 school days to the dean of the college in which the grade was assigned. The dean will investigate and recommend a solution.
  4. University Grade Appeals Committee or Graduate Council: If the problem is not resolved with the dean’s recommendation, either party, within 7 school days, may appeal in writing to the appropriate committee/council. Appeals for final grades received in undergraduate courses are submitted to the University Grade Appeals Committee; appeals for final grades received in graduate courses are submitted to the Graduate Council. If an appeal involves either a faculty member or student member of the committee or the Graduate Council, a substitute faculty member or student member of the committee/Council will be chosen to serve for that appeal only.
    1. Within 15 school days of receipt of a written appeal from a student or faculty member, the Grade Appeals Committee, or Graduate Council when appropriate, will consider the matter to determine if the appeal has sufficient basis to conduct a formal hearing. A vote of yes by two members of the Committee, or Graduate Council when appropriate, will be required to grant a formal hearing. In the case where a formal hearing is denied, the student will be notified of the finding and given 14 days to submit additional information and request a reconsideration of the case. The Committee, or Graduate Council when appropriate, will review the additional information and a re-vote will be taken whether to grant a formal hearing.
    2. If a formal hearing is scheduled, both the faculty member and the student will be given at least four school days’ prior notice of the date, time, and place of the hearing. At the hearing, both the faculty member and the student will appear, will be allowed to present their cases, and will be allowed to introduce into evidence tests, papers, grade reports, records of class procedures, and the like, in support of their cases. If the Committee, or Graduate Council when appropriate, feels further evidence is needed, it may call on other witnesses to give additional information. The Committee, or Graduate Council when appropriate, will deliver its written recommendation to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the dean, the department head, the faculty member, and the student involved.

If the Grade Appeals Committee or Graduate Council rules in favor of the student, it will recommend the appropriate grade change. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will then rule on the recommendation of the committee/Council and inform, in writing, the student, the faculty member, the Registrar, and other appropriate University personnel.

Transcript of Academic Record

  1. Any person who has attended the University may obtain an academic transcript if he/she is clear with all departments. The request must be signed by the person whose transcript is being requested. More information can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar or the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese. edu/registrar/transcripts.php.
  2. Except during school holidays and at the end of the semester, transcripts are usually prepared within two to three days after the request is received. At the end of each semester, approximately five days are required to process a transcript request.

Academic Integrity Policy

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McNeese State University seeks to strengthen the value of student academic achievement by fostering a learning environment which is based on honesty, respect, fairness, responsibility, and excellence. Consequently, the University expects that all members of its academic community will demonstrate honesty and integrity in all academic relationships. The purpose of the Academic Integrity policy is to provide students, faculty, and staff with guidelines about what behaviors violate academic integrity expectations, and the process for addressing academic integrity issues.

Definitions Related to the Academic Integrity Policy

  1. Cheating: Cheating is defined as the act of giving unauthorized assistance to or receiving unauthorized assistance from another individual or other source for the purpose of completing academic requirements. This includes, but is not limited to, completion of homework, tests, projects, research assignments, or other course requirements. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    1. during an examination, receiving or giving information not allowed by the instructor’to include allowing another student to copy work;
    2. plagiarizing or representing another person’s work (published or unpublished) as one’s own;
    3. copying all or part of another’s work and claiming it as one’s own;
    4. copying all or parts of information (either word for word or with interchanging words) without citing the source;
    5. obtaining, distributing, or referring to a copy of an examination which the instructor and/or department has not authorized to be made available for such purpose;
    6. submitting work that has been previously or is being concurrently used in a different class by oneself or by another student. (Special permission from the instructor who assigns work must be obtained to develop work for a class which was prepared for another class.);
    7. misrepresentation of data for any purpose;
    8. other examples of academic misconduct. A cheating violation may result in a penalty imposed by the instructor and/or may be referred to the Dean of Student Services for presentation to the Academic Integrity Council (AIC).
  2. Falsification: Falsification is defined as altering official University documents, forging signatures of University officials or any other individual, or any other attempt to misrepresent official and/or institutional documents or records. This violation is referred to the Dean of Student Services who will determine if the case should be presented to the University Discipline Committee.
  3. Unauthorized Access: This includes acquiring unauthorized access to property, information, or materials which belong to another person. Materials may belong to another student, a faculty or staff member, or the University, and can be acquired in any form. This violation is referred to the Dean of Student Services who will determine if the case should be presented to the University Discipline Committee.

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy

  1. Academic misconduct by a student at the University is determined by the faculty member under whom such misconduct occurs. Instructors have the option of presenting possible academic integrity violations directly to the Dean of Student Services who will determine if the Academic Integrity Panel should hear the case. A student wishing to report a violation of academic integrity should inform the appropriate instructor or the Dean of Student Services.
  2. The penalty for cheating, which is determined by the faculty member, may range from an ‘F’ on the specific assessment (quiz, test, project, etc.), to an ‘F’ in the course.
  3. The student may opt to accept the penalty or may appeal to the Dean of Student Services for a hearing by the Academic Integrity Panel which is established by the Academic Integrity Council. Panel decisions are binding on all parties.
  4. The Academic Integrity Panel may confirm an instructor’s penalty and/or move to impose other penalties including suspension or dismissal from the University. Penalties imposed and/or confirmed by the Academic Integrity Panel may be appealed for procedural review only. In cases of suspension of one year or more, and in cases of dismissal, students may appeal to the University President and then through processes specified by the Board of Supervisors.
  5. Withdrawal from a course may not supersede any disciplinary measures imposed by the Academic Integrity Panel.
  6. If the Academic Integrity Panel finds that no academic integrity violation has occurred, the instructor should work with the Panel to adjust the student’s grade as appropriate.
  7. Cases of academic misconduct and the penalty imposed should be reported in writing to the department head and the Dean of Student Services.

Cases involving falsification or unauthorized access must be submitted to the Dean of Student Services who will determine if a hearing by University Discipline Committee is appropriate. The penalty for falsification or unauthorized access may be determined by the Dean of Student Services or the University Discipline Committee.

Veterans and Veterans’ Children

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Information about various Veterans Administration (VA) educational assistance programs is available in the Assistant Registrar’s Office. Qualified students who have never received VA educational benefits should visit that office to begin the application process. Qualified students who wish to be certified to VA for educational benefits should submit to the Assistant Registrar’s Office a Request to be Certified (McNeese Form R-471) each semester they wish to receive benefits. VA students who have previously received VA educational benefits but have changed majors, changed schools, or have not attended McNeese in more than six months must also submit VA form 22-1995. All necessary VA forms are available in the Assistant Registrar’s Office or on the University’s Web site at http://www.mcneese.edu/registrar/va.php.

The VA student and school officials have a mutual responsibility for complying with the law and regulations pertaining to veterans and other eligible persons. Additional information about veterans’ educational benefits is available at http://www.gibill.va.gov/.

General Test Program Requirements

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  1. All entering freshmen must have an official ACT or SAT score on file, unless exempted by admission requirements.
  2. Every undergraduate student enrolled in a four-year degree program must take the MAAP (Midpoint Assessment of Academic Progress) exam as soon as possible after earning 48 semester hours and before earning 80 semester hours. This exam is an assessment of the knowledge and skills gained regarding the general education core. The University may administer assessment tests, other than MAAP, designed to measure academic progress.
  3. In addition, before graduation, all seniors will be required to demonstrate competency in their major field. That ‘capstone experience’ will be selected by the department from which the student graduates.

Midpoint Assessment of Academic Progress (MAAP)

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) requires that a member institution periodically measure knowledge/skill gained by its students. One of the measures that McNeese uses for this purpose is the Midpoint Assessment of Academic Progress (MAAP). The purposes of MAAP testing at McNeese State University are:

  • to measure educational development of students in core academic areas after the completion of the general education curriculum;
  • to determine the readiness of students for beginning junior-level course work;
  • to identify weaknesses and strengths of the general education curriculum at McNeese State University for use in decision making regarding the general education core; and
  • to provide students soon after the mid-point of their college career with concrete information on which to base their decisions regarding careers and educational goals.

All students enrolled in a four-year degree program must take the MAAP or other designated exam as soon as possible after earning 48 semester hours and before earning 80 semester hours. Students must have earned credit for English 101 AND English 102 AND Math 113 or 170 or 190 prior to taking the exam. Students who have earned 80 semester hours without completing the assessment exam are not allowed to earn credit for 300/400 level courses and may be dropped from any courses in progress.

The following students are not required to take the MAAP: a) students transferring in 48 or more semester hours; b) students earning 80 semester hours prior to fall semester 1991; c) students enrolled in a two-year degree program which does not include the MAAP as a degree requirement.

The MAAP or assessment exam is administered each fall and spring semester. Registration information is available in the appropriate semester class schedule. Questions and appeals regarding the academic assessment exam should be directed to the Testing Officer in Kaufman Hall, Room 156, or at (337) 475-5140.

Eligibility

A student is permitted to represent the University in competitive activity with other institutions only if enrolled as a full-time regular student.

Academic Probation, Suspension, and Readmission Regulations for Undergraduates

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There are three categories of academic status: academic good standing and eligible to be enrolled; academic probation and eligible to be enrolled; and academic suspension and not eligible to be enrolled. Academic standing notations appear on the academic transcript. Although students will usually receive official notification of academic status, such notice is not a prerequisite to students being placed in one of the above categories. Students have the responsibility to ascertain their academic status prior to the beginning of the next enrollment period. Colleges within the University may set higher academic status rules.

Academic Probation

  1. A student will be placed on academic probation whenever the cumulative average is 10 or more quality points below a 2.0 average; that is, the total number of hours pursued, multiplied by two, exceeds the quality points earned by 10 or more.
  2. Once on academic probation, a student will remain on probation (as long as each semester or summer session average is at least 2.0) until the cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is achieved.
  3. Once a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is achieved, a student will be placed in academic good standing.
  4. Transfer students may be admitted on probation, pending receipt of credentials to determine academic status.

Academic Suspension

  1. A student on academic probation will be suspended at the conclusion of any semester or summer session in which a grade-point average of at least 2.0 is not obtained. First-time freshmen will not be suspended prior to the completion of two semesters of enrollment.
  2. The first period of suspension will be for one regular semester. A student suspended for the first time at the end of the spring semester may attend the summer session without appeal. If the cumulative grade-point average is raised to 2.0 or higher, the student is placed in academic good standing and the suspension period is lifted. The student may then attend the fall semester without appeal. If the student does not raise the cumulative grade-point average to 2.0 or higher in the summer session, the suspension for the fall semester is in effect. In this case, only one suspension is counted.
  3. A second or subsequent suspension is for one calendar year. A student suspended for a second or subsequent time at the end of the spring semester may also attend the summer session without appeal.
  4. A student suspended at the end of any term or semester may appeal to the Academic Appeals Committee to be readmitted. Appeal forms may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The committee may grant, delay, or deny a student’s appeal. If the appeal is denied by the committee, the student may appeal to his/her academic dean for readmission.
  5. A student suspended from a University of Louisiana System institution may not enroll in another university within the System, but may enroll in a community college with approval of both the suspending institution and the community college. Credits earned under these conditions may be accepted for degree credit at the suspending institution provided grades of ‘C’ or higher are earned in each of the courses to be transferred.
  6. Registration will be cancelled for a student who registers during regular registration (prior to the end of a semester or summer session) and is then suspended.
  7. Transfer students who have been suspended from other systems may appeal to enroll at University of Louisiana System institutions during the academic suspension period only if they have a 2.0 cumulative average. Appeals may be granted or denied.

Other Suspensions - A student may be suspended or expelled from the University for reasons other than poor academic performance. In these cases, if a student is permanently dismissed from the University, the notation ‘ineligible to enroll’ will appear on the student’s academic transcript. If a student is dismissed for a specific period of time, the notation ‘eligible to return (semester) (year)’ will appear on the student’s academic transcript.

Graduation Requirements

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Candidates for a degree must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Complete curriculum requirements listed in one issue of the University Catalog.
    1. The catalog in effect when the student first registered in that curriculum, at McNeese or at another regionally accredited institution, is followed. However, the student may choose to follow updated curriculum requirements that become effective while enrolled in that curriculum. In the case of a transfer student, supporting documents showing original entry into the program must be furnished. Students may be required to comply with changes as they are implemented.
    2. Students who interrupt their college work for one calendar year or more will be required to complete the degree requirements in effect at the time of re-entry.
    3. If a student changes to another curriculum and then changes back to the former curriculum, the catalog in effect at the time of returning to the former curriculum is the one followed.
    4. Students are expected to complete undergraduate degree requirements within ten years. After that time, students become subject to current catalog requirements.
    5. Changes may be made without prior notice, and students may be required to comply with curriculum changes when they become effective.
  2. Have a minimum grade-point average of ‘C’ in all courses credited toward the degree, as well as a grade-point average of ‘C’ in work completed at McNeese which is credited toward the degree.
  3. Have an overall grade-point average of ‘C’ in the major field.
  4. Meet specific departmental requirements.
  5. Complete statewide general education requirements as mandated by the Louisiana Board of Regents. These general education requirements are specified in the Core Requirements section.
  6. Clear all University accounts.
  7. File an application for degree at the time of registration for the last semester or summer session in which the candidate completes degree requirements.
  8. Be present for commencement exercises unless approval to be absent is given by the Dean of Student Services.

Bachelor Degree

Candidates for a bachelor degree must fulfill the general requirements and the following requirements:

  1. Earn a minimum of 40 semester hours in courses numbered above 300.
  2. Earn a minimum of 12 semester hours in courses numbered above 300 required for the major. Six semester hours of these courses must be earned in residence at McNeese.
  3. Earn in residence at least 25 percent of the semester hours offered in fulfillment of degree requirements, exclusive of credit by examination or advanced placement credit.
  4. Complete the final 30 semester hours at McNeese. Any exceptions must have the written approval of the appropriate department head and dean.

Associate Degree

Candidates for an associate degree must fulfill the general requirements and the following requirements:

  1. Earn in residence at least 25 percent of the semester hours offered in fulfillment of degree requirements, exclusive of credit by examination or advanced placement credit.
  2. Complete the final 15 semester hours at McNeese. Three of these semester hours must be in the major field. Any exceptions must have the written approval of the appropriate department head and dean.

Second Undergraduate Degrees

  1. To receive a second bachelor degree, a student must earn an additional thirty semester hours and sixty quality points and meet all requirements for the second degree; however, the second degree cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has previously earned a bachelor’s degree or double major.
  2. To receive a second associate degree, a student must earn an additional fifteen semester hours and thirty quality points and meet all requirements for the second degree; however, the second degree cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has previously earned an associate or bachelor’s degree or double major.
  3. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements.

Minors, Double Majors, and Concentrations

  1. Requirements for minors and double majors must be approved by the department head and the dean of the college of the appropriate academic curriculum.
  2. Any substitutions for courses in a minor or a double major degree plan must be approved in advance by the department head and the dean of the college of the appropriate academic curriculum.
  3. All requirements for minors, concentrations, and additional majors must be completed prior to graduation. Minors, concentrations, and additional majors will not be awarded or indicated on the official transcript if requirements are completed subsequent to graduation.
  4. A minor cannot be earned in an area of study in which the student has already earned a degree or double major.

Privilege to Graduating Seniors

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  1. Graduating seniors who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.2 on all undergraduate work attempted and lack no more than 30 semester hours to complete baccalaureate degree requirements may be allowed to register for graduate credit.
  2. Students pursuing this privilege must obtain approval from their academic department head, their academic dean, and the graduate dean. An approved form verifying that no more than 30 semester hours are lacking to complete baccalaureate degree requirements and confirming a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.2 must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.
  3. Students may earn no more than 12 graduate credit hours while completing baccalaureate requirements.
  4. Courses taken for graduate credit cannot be used to satisfy undergraduate requirements.
  5. Students retain their undergraduate status until they receive the baccalaureate degree.
  6. While in the concurrent undergraduate/graduate status, students all maintain a minimum cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0.
  7. Because the GMAT/grade point average admission formula must be met, this privilege does not apply to credit offered through the MBA program.
  8. This arrangement is to be considered a special privilege to outstanding graduating seniors and does not imply admission to the Dor’ School of Graduate Studies.

Academic Honors

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Honor Roll - Any full-time student who earns a grade-point average of 3.0 or better in any semester is placed on the honor roll for that semester.

President’s Honor Roll - A student who earns a grade point average of 3.5 or better and carries at least 15 semester hours with grades that generate quality points is placed on the President’s Honor List for that semester. A graduating senior carrying less than fifteen hours of work is considered for the honor provided the student was on the President’s Honor List the previous semester.

Graduation Honors - A baccalaureate student is graduated with the appropriate honor designation by earning the following cumulative grade-point averages:

  • Summa Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 3.90-4.00
  • Magna Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 3.70-3.89
  • Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 3.50-3.69.

To fairly determine graduation honors, McNeese considers the entire academic record of each student, including credits attempted and earned prior to filing Academic Bankruptcy or Amnesty at McNeese or any other institution.

 

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